Hazlewood’s lost record

In the exciting finish to the Auckland ODI on January 30, commentators mentioned  Hazlewood’s durability as a batsman-as he had never been dismissed in 33 ODIs. Unfortunately, his luck ran out when Australia needed 7 runs for victory:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/new-zealand-v-australia-2016-17/engine/match/1020013.html

Note that he was dismissed for a diamond duck, as he did not face a single ball in a partnership of 24 balls and 54 runs, and was run out as a non-striker.

We look at the relevant records as they were on Jan 29:

Most ODIs without a dismissal:

hazlewood1

Most ODI innings without a dismissal:

hazlewood2

Hazlewood had played in 33 ODIs, more than twice the tally of the next in line. He shared the record for 6 innings without dismissal with the little-known Bermudan player SKW Kelly.

After today’s match (January 30):

Most ODIs without a dismissal:

hazlewood3

The record now passes to Ahsan Malik and Dhawal Kulkarni.

Most ODI innings without a dismissal:

hazlewood4

And so Bermuda has this record to itself. (Some say they had a record in Dwayne Leverock being the heaviest international cricketer in recent times. He was a popular figure during the 2007 World Cup, the only time Bermuda reached that level).

http://www.espncricinfo.com/bermuda/content/player/23742.html

We also look at the corresponding records for T20Is, as on Jan 30, 2017:

Most T20I matches without dismissal:

hazlewood5

The top 3 led by Steve Finn are still likely to play in international matches, so the record may change hands.

Most T20I innings without dismissal:

hazlewood6

AF Milne has the record for the moment.

 

 

 

 

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The Lac-Megantic disaster of 2013

The Indian Railways are often the butt of jokes when a number of accidents happen in succession. But it is cold comfort to know that railway operating procedures in developed countries are far from perfect. As in the case of the derailment followed by fire at Lac-Megantic in Quebec province on July 6, 2013.

Here is a  Powerpoint presentation on this accident, which was used in a conference of safety engineering at IIT Gandhinagar in January 2017.

the-fire-disaster-at-lac-megantic-quebec

Note the videos on slides 8 and 9. They are important in understanding the sequence of events. The one on slide 8 is more accurate and is largely based on the accident investigation report. The one on slide 9 has a serious error as it shows the train slipping backwards, with the tank cars leading the locomotives. In fact the train went down the incline in its existing configuration of locomotives followed by other cars and tank cars.

You may wonder if something like this could happen on the Indian Railways. Certainly a heavy goods train would not be left totally unattended on an incline in mid-section. That is exactly what happened here.

There are a number of safety-related issues which have not been covered above, such as the hazards caused by additives used to increase the viscosity of crude oil for transportation.

For further reading:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lac-M%C3%A9gantic_rail_disaster

http://www.tsb.gc.ca/eng/rapports-reports/rail/2013/r13d0054/r13d0054-r-es.asp

 

 

When Trump meets Bolmondoley

Joke writers have a tough time with President Trump. He creates so many opportunities for jokes that they have little to do. Or he says something which is too difficult to decipher, and it may or may not be funny. One such occasion was the use of the word “bigly” which is supposed to be a new word he invented.

However, experts have concluded that it was a wrong transcription of the more common “Big league”, particularly as his brand of New York English was not understood by most. More on this here:

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-37483869

and here: http://edition.cnn.com/videos/politics/2017/01/25/bag-the-bigly-moos-pkg-erin.cnn/video/playlists/wacky-world-of-jeanne-moos/

There are, of course, place names and person’s names similar to “bigly’, like this one-time English cricketer:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/england/content/player/12454.html

But British English has its share of pitfalls with words often being spelt in a way which do not reflect the pronunciation. Like Cholmondoley. Think you can pronounce it?

Find out here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NTLkJqpC-A

The humorous possibilities in Cholmondoley being pronounced as Chumly was not lost on music-hall comedians of a century ago, who were noted for their low level of humour. Some examples can be seen here:

http://audiotalk.proboards.com/thread/3587

One example of such corny humour was bringing someone on stage with a placard saying “Bolmondeley”. Go figure.

Meet Hardik Patel-not the one you are thinking of

The name’s Patel. Hardik Patel.

Unlike my better-known namesake, I only trouble opposing batsmen.

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/player/793915.html

https://cricket.yahoo.com/photos/india-a-vs-south-africans-slideshow/hardik-patel-of-india-a-take-the-wicket-of-david-miller-of-south-africa-during-the-t20-warm-up-photo-1443529291229.html

For example, see this scorecard for the Irani Cup:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/irani-cup-2016-17/engine/match/1053705.html

Maybe one day the national selectors will accidentally include me instead of Hardik Pandya. (Something of this sort happened because of confusion between two J.Yadavs some years ago).

Score 500 and lose

From Journalism 101: “When a dog bites a man, it is not news.

When a man bites a dog, it is news”

Similarly: When Bangladesh loses a Test, it is not news.

When Bangladesh scores almost 600 and loses a Test, it is news.

Here is a list of instances where a side scored 500 or more and still lost a Test:

500-and-lose-a

It can be seen that Bangladesh now has the record score in a loss, surpassing the 586 by Australia well over a century ago.

All of these instances came in the first or second innings of the match, except for the 510 by India in 1967. That was in a follow-on, and the Test is remembered partly for Pataudi’s 64 and 148 and more for Boycott being dropped for excessively slow scoring on the way to his Test best of 246*: http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/63004.html

We also look at scores of 450 or more in the 3rd and 4th inning in losses:

500-and-lose-b

The highest 3rd-innings score in a loss is 510 as mentioned above. For the 4th innings it is 451 by NZ in 2001-02, which Pakistan just failed to cross earlier this season.

Taking another look at the scorecard of Bangladesh’s recent loss:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/new-zealand-v-bangladesh-2016-17/engine/match/1019985.html

We see that Bangladesh’s innings included 217 by Shakib, which is the highest Test individual score for Bangladesh. The only other double centuries are 206 by Tamim and 200 by Mushfiqur. Incidentally, Shakib is one of the few to score a double century and duck in the same Test (regardless of the result). The highest such score is 245 by Shoaib Malik vs England in 2015-16.

There are, however, many instances of double centuries being scored in innings of sides losing Tests:

200-and-lose

The record continues to be with RT Ponting with 242. Other greats including Lara, Graeme Pollock, Harvey  and Hayden also appear here.

All of these efforts came in the first or second innings except for Astle’s 222 which figured in New Zealand’s 451 mentioned above:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/63981.html

We also look at individual scores of 175 and above in the 3rd and 4th innings for losing teams:

175-and-lose

The highest such score in the 3rd innings is 199* by Andy Flower. Numerous other well-known players also appear here.

An afterthought-we look at combined scores in both innings by a batsman in a losing side:

match-total-in-lost-test

Although there are numerous instances of centuries in both innings of a lost Test, Lara is the only one to make a double century and a century. Andy Flower just missed it with his 142 and 199*. Also note Ponting’s 242 and 0.

 

 

 

Tests between Australia and Pakistan-2

We continue our study of study of the 2016-17 series.

First we take up Fielding: (15 or more dismissals)

most-dismissals

Rod Marsh and Wasim Bari are predictably at the top. ME Waugh (23) and Border and Greg Chappell (22 apiece) have the most catches as non-keepers. Wasim Bari has the most stumpings (10).

Best innings fielding (4 and more dismissals):

innings-fielding

Several keepers have 5 dismissals in an innings. The most by non-keepers is 4 by Hanif, Alan Turner, Border and Boon.

Best match fielding (6 or more dismissals):

match-fielding

While Haddin alone has taken 9 dismissals followed by Grout and Latif with 8, no non-keeper has taken 6 catches.

Dismissal rate (minimum 20 innings,average 0.400 per innings):

field-avg

Rod Marsh just edges out Wasim Bari from the top spot. Among the non-keeper, Mark Taylor and Boon have the highest dismissal rates.

Now for All-Round performance:

Overall performance: (see the criteria):

ar-overall

Imran Khan is the only one with a good performance while Wasim Akram is far behind.

All-round match performances (minimum one fifty and one fiver):

ar-match

Only these two qualify (not even Imran). Note that Akram scored a century and took a fiver.

Tests between Australia and Pakistan-1

With this 3-0 sweep by Australia in Australia, this is the final record for Tests between the two countries:

overall-table

What is more important is that Pakistan has lost 3-0 in 4 successive test series in Australia, namely in:

1999-2000

2004-05

2009-10

2016-17

In between, on neutral venues Australia won 3-0 in SL and UAE in 2002-03, drew 1-1 in England in 2010, and Pakistan won 2-0 in UAE in 2014-15. No matches were drawn in these series.

We now look at the statistics for individual players:

Batting:

Most runs (750 and above):

most-runs

The first few places are predictable. Miandad, Border, Greg Chappell and Ijaz Ahmed scored 6 centuries apiece. The most 50+ scores were 14 by Border and Zaheer Abbas. followed by 13 by Miandad. Current players in this list include Younis Khan and Azhar Ali.

Highest scores (160 and above):

hs-scores

Among current players there are Azhar Ali, MT Renshaw, Younis Khan and SPD Smith.

Azhar Ali’s 205* is the highest for Pakistan in Australia, surpassing Majid Khan’s 158 in Melbourne in 1972-73. Younis Khan with 175* also surpassed this later in the series.

Batting averages (Minimum 20 innings, complete list):

batting-avg

Interesting that Mark Taylor has a much higher average than the second-placed Ponting. Younis Khan is the only current player who has played 20 innings. He has the highest average among Pakistani players. This list goes down to McGrath and his likes with single-figure averages. Wasim Bari has a surprisingly low average.

Now for bowling performances:

Most wickets (20 and above):

most-wkts

The first few are predictable. Mohammed Amir and Yasir Shah are the only current players here.

The most fivers were by Warne (6) and Lillee (5).

The most tenners were also by Warne (2).

The best innings bowling (including all hauls of 7 or more wickets):

inningsbowl

None from the recent past. The table is headed by Sarfraz Nawaz’s freak performance in 1978-79, where his spell of 7 for 1 reduced Australia from 305/3 to 310 and defeat.

Best match bowling (including all hauls of 9 wickets and above):

matchbowl

Again, nothing from recent years. Fazal Mahmood’s record 13-114 in the first Test between these teams has remained a record since 1956, while Imran’s 12-165 in 1977 brought Pakistan it’s first victory in Australia.

Bowling averages (Minimum 2000 balls bowled, all instances):

bowling-avg

Fairly predictable, with no one from recent years.

It can also be seen that the best economy rates were 2.23 by Tauseef Ahmed, 2.25 by Iqbal Qasim and 2.40 by Imran. The best strike rates were 45.0 by Warne, 47.9 by McGrath and 59.8 by Wasim Akram.

To be continued.