Fielding fails in ODIs

Data correct as on March 14, 2017

In the previous post on fielding fails in T20Is, we saw that the “leader” Amir Hamza had played in many more matches and innings than the second-placed Rangana Herath. We see the same trend here in the list of those who failed to make a fielding dismissal in their ODI career (10 or more innings):

No dis

We have here some fairly well-known Test players including New Zealand captain Bevan Congdon, Jermaine Lawson and Clayton Lambert (who added a few ODIs for the USA after he had finished with the West Indies). But the leader here is Ata-ur-Rehman who played 13 Tests for Pakistan in the mid-90s, supplementing the bowling of the two Ws. His career ended in disgrace after the match-fixing scandal earned him a life ban from cricket in 2000. The ban was lifted in 2006 although he could not do much afterwards. However, he does have this record of 30 ODIs and 30 innings fielded without a dismissal, which is considerably more than the second-placed HP Rinke of Zimbabwe, with a mere 18 ODIs and innings. Jermaine Lawson had a brief Test career but still holds the Test innings record of 6 wickets for 3 runs.

We now look at wicket-keepers who failed to make a dismissal:

No dis-wk

This is a complete list of all such instances. Here there are a few Test players such as David Boon (who kept in one ODI without success), JA Maclean and XM Marshall. Like Boon, Xavier Marshall was not a regular keeper but failed in the one match where he kept.

There is the unfortunate FS Crockwell of Bermuda (who became a homicide victim in 2016) and JJ Dawood of Canada, who never got to field in the match where he was the designated keeper. He did field in one other ODI when he was not the keeper, but did not take a catch there either.

Finally, we look at those who never fielded in their ODI career:

No inns

A short list indeed. Akila Dananjaya did not get to bat in Sri Lanka’s innings which was ended by rain which also washed out the entire New Zealand innings. He did however play some T20Is in which he took one catch. If he had become better known, cricket writers would have had to become more familiar with his full name of MKPAD Perera:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/srilanka/content/player/574178.html

Fielding fails in T20Is

(Data correct as on 14 Mar 2017)

After looking at batting and bowling fails in all three formats, we turn our attention to those who failed to make any fielding dismissal in their careers.

Here we have these players arranged in order of innings fielded:

Nodis-inngs

Amir Hamza of Afghanistan leads by a large margin over the better known Rangana Herath, currently the Sri Lankan Test captain and the only current Test player who made his debut in the 1990s.

Amir Hamza is an useful bowler but not much of a batsman either. But he is a regular for ODIs and T20Is at the moment.

A number of other somewhat well-known international players appear here, including some Test players.

You can see that the results would be virtually the same if you arrange them in order of matches played.

Now we look at wicket-keepers who have failed to dismiss anyone:

Nodis-inngs-wk

A number of Test and ODI players here, who have at least made some dismissals at those levels. The leader here is Regis Chakabva (9 Tests, 9 dismissals) followed by Carlton Baugh  (no less than 21 Tests, 43 catches and 5 stumpings). NV Ojha has played one Test and one ODI and has made dismissals in both.

Finally, we look at those who never fielded in their T20I career:

Nofield

Nothing profound here. These two players from Netherlands were involved in a washed-out game against Ireland in 2008. As the toss was made, ICC rules state that this match counts in their career records. (Statisticians may disagree; as some disregard matches involving the ICC XI and their like, perhaps these matches should also be disregarded).

While Mol did play several ODIs, Schoonheim did not play for his country on any other occasion.

The decline of the Indian Bradshaw

The original Bradshaw started by George Bradshaw in Britain in 1839 lasted up to the early 1960s. The Indian Bradshaw was apparently not connected to the original one and apparently started publication in around 1868. A copy from 2003 mentions “135th year of publication”.

It has its place in Indian railway history as for many years it was the only consolidated source of information for the numerous railway companies all over the country-the big and the small, the railways owned by the Indian government, princely states and private companies. Many of these companies did bring out their own timetables but they would have had limited availability and would have been almost impossible to obtain outside their areas of operation. Hence the need for all-India coverage was filled by the Bradshaw which appears to have been published by W.Newman & Co of Calcutta for most of the time.

After Independence and regrouping in the 1950s, there was a regular publication called the All-India Railway Timetable which existed at least from the mid-60s and coexisted with the Indian Bradshaw. A typical page of the old Indian Bradshaw (this one from 1951):

Brad1951 000

And this one from the official All India Time Table of 1975 (though it did not always have advertisements on the cover):

TT75cover

This All India timetable appeared for the last time in 1976 and was replaced by “Trains at a Glance”, often referred to as TAAG by railfans. This covered only the reasonably important routes and the reasonably important stations on them.

The 9 zones of that time used to publish their own timetables which were generally available only in their own zones (though I remember a bookstall at Delhi Jn which used to have most of the zonal timetables). Once the All India Time Table ceased to exist the only reference for train timings all over the country (including the obscure branch lines) became the Bradshaw. It continued to be useful until the mid-2000s, when it still gave detailed coverage of the entire network (although the major suburban networks were never there). Here is one of the Bradshaws of that period:

Bradshaw 2003 001

Soon the publishers stopped covering the minor routes (and thus reduced it to a badly printed clone of TAAG). By 2005 the mess of 16 zones was addressed by the appearance of 5 zonal timetables which, between them, covered all the non-suburban services running in the country. Hard-core timetable fans concentrated on acquiring these. The networks like IRFCA had messages like “Wanted South Zone TT. Will send West Zone TT in return”.

By then, the original publishers seem to have lost interest in the Bradshaw and sold (or passed on) the brand name to other parties. This changed hands at least once more. As of today, the Indian Bradshaw is still published (but has not been seen by most railfans in recent years-not even in Kolkata).

In the mean time the Thomas Cook international timetables also ceased publication, leaving foreign tourists without a convenient source of detailed information.

Even railfans in Kolkata have had to take a lot of trouble to find a copy. Apparently the number printed is quite low now. Anyway, you can see proof of its existence below (along with the contact details of the distributors):

Bradshaw details 001

Note the prominent typo on the back cover. Nitpickers may also add that the Kolkata Metro is the 17th zone. One can also nitpick that the Konkan Railway is counted as a zone though it is not legally a part of Indian Railways (though operationally it certainly belongs to IR).

Is the present form of the Indian Bradshaw worth buying? Sadly, no. It does not seem to contain any information which is NOT contained in Trains at a Glance and costs more (particularly as the latter can be be easily downloaded for free, and detailed information is available from a variety of official and unofficial resources on the Net). And if you prefer hard copies, the 5 zonal timetables (plus separate suburban timetables for Mumbai, Chennai and Kolkata) are still around.

Thanks to Souroshanka Maji for taking the trouble to locate a copy of this 2016 edition.

Articles on world railways (including IR) from the 1930s

This apparently little-known website contains a large number of articles on railways around the world from the 1930s. They seem to have been put together in 1935. It is not clear which publication they originally appeared in.

http://www.internationalsteam.co.uk/tales/MHR.htm

Material relating to railways in India (and a little of Pakistan) can be found here:

http://mikes.railhistory.railfan.net/r019.html

http://mikes.railhistory.railfan.net/r007.html

http://mikes.railhistory.railfan.net/r144.html

There are also numerous articles on railways in other countries.

Bowling fails in Test matches

Continuing the thread from here:

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2017/03/07/bowling-fails-in-odis/

Here we consider the bowlers who failed to take a wicket in their Test careers. They do include some specialist bowlers who lost their Test place quickly, but are more likely to be batsmen with limited bowling ability who sometimes bowled a few overs to give some rest to the regular bowlers. There are even some wicket-keepers who bowled a little.

We start with the most runs conceded without taking a wicket (90 runs and above):

Most runs no wkt

We can see that there are some specialist bowlers with short careers as well as well-known batsmen (notably GA Headley, Habibul Bashar and K Srikkanth). Srikkanth was more successful in ODIs where he took two fivers. But it is the forgotten AH Monir of Bangladesh who heads this list.

Now for the most balls bowled without taking a wicket (150 balls and above):

Most balls no wkt

JL Hopwood was close to the top in the first table and heads this table. He had the misfortune to bowl against a strong Australian lineup with Bradman and friends. Headley comes next followed by Monir. As above, there is a mix of specialist bowlers and part-timers.

Most innings bowled without taking a wicket (6 and above):

Most innings no wkt

Srikkanth heads this list-perhaps he and Headley can be considered as the most determined of the part-timers. Many others like Bradman and Gavaskar bowled on rare occasions but did take at least one wicket. So did some keepers such as Boucher and Kirmani (not to forget AF Lyttleton’s 4-wicket haul). Some current players such as Kohli and Voges have so far been unsuccessful.

Most matches played without taking a wicket (75 and above):

Most matches no wkt

Sangakkara and Stewart (who kept wicket in most of their Tests) head this list, though there are also non-keepers like Lara, Strauss, Inzamam and Vengsarkar near the top. And there are some who never bowled throughout their long Test careers. More about them later. For now, we look at

Most matches played by non-keepers without taking a wicket (75 and above):

most matches no wkt (nk)

Note Fleming and Strauss who played the most Tests without ever bowling. We look into this category further:

Most matches played without ever bowling (50 and above):

most matches never bowled

Many keepers in this list, so we look at the non-keepers.

Most matches played by non-keepers without ever bowling (50 and above):

Most matches never bowled (nk)

SP Fleming heads this list, followed by Strauss and Misbah.

While wicketless players do not have a bowling average or a strike rate, they do have an economy rate. We close with

Best economy rate for those who never took a wicket (150 balls and above):

Best econ rate

Oddly enough this is headed by Australian RJ Quiney who is not a regular bowler in domestic cricket. A few other part-timers (LS Darling and Roope to begin with) have better economy rates than the specialist bowlers. We have already met AH Monir who is the most expensive here. We may as well learn more about him:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/bangladesh/content/player/56235.html

The Test debutants of 2016-2

We complete this review with a look at the fielding and all-round performances of those who made their Test debut in 2016.

Of the 44 debutants, only one, PJ Moor of Zimbabwe, was a wicket-keeper. He took precisely one catch on debut. So whatever we have here is applicable to non-keepers.

Most dismissals in an innings (2 or more):

Debut inn field

Most dismissals in a match (4 or more):

Debut mat field

Hameed and Raval have the best performances here, as well as in batting and fielding (see below). The South Asian diaspora seems to be coming along well.

All-round performances (at least 30 runs and 3 wickets in match):

Debut mat AR

All-round performances (at least 30 runs and 3 dismissals in match):

Debut match ARF

 

The Test debutants of 2016-1

A total of 44 players made their Test debut during the calendar year 2016. Here we take a look at their performances in their debut matches and briefly look at their progress until February 2017.

Innings scores of 40 and above:

Debut inn 40

and match totals of 50 and above:

Debut mat 50

12 instances of 50+ on debut, including centuries by SC Cook and KK Jennings. 3 others (J Yadav, Dhananjaya de Silva and KS Maharaj) also scored at least 50 runs in the match. H Hameed scored over 100 in his debut match without a century. Jennings became one of only 4 to score a century and duck on debut; GR Viswanath was the first to do so.

Cook has so far made 3 centuries and Dhananjaya  and Handscomb 2 apiece, while others including Gunaratne and Yadav have also scored centuries. Most of those listed above have made steady progress as batsmen (and in some cases as bowlers).

Looking at bowling performances on debut;

4 wickets in an innings:

Debut inn 4wi

6 wickets in a match:

Debut mat 6wm

The best innings and match performances were by Zimbabwe-born C de Grandhomme. MH Miraz did almost as well, conceding a few more runs. Miraz went on to take two 6-fors in his second Test and was instrumental in Bangladesh’s first Test victory over England. He has also displayed some batting ability in his last few Tests, as has de Grandhomme.

To be continued:

 

 

Cricketer’s deaths in 2016 (Revised in June 2018)

This covers various people connected with cricket who passed away in the calendar year 2016. It includes all Test players and several other categories such as Test umpires, prominent journalists and administrators, prominent female cricketers and better-known domestic cricketers (mainly from India and England). Some subjectivity is involved here.

This had earlier appeared in early 2017. It has been revised in June 2018 with additional information.

Cricketers deaths-2016

Or, if you prefer:

Cricketers deaths-2016-1

and

Cricketers deaths-2016-2

I had earlier done similar summaries for 2014 and 2015, which can be found elsewhere on this blog.

From Gandhinagar to Gandhinagar

As we have seen in

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2017/01/13/indian-railway-stations-with-matching-names/

there are many pairs of railway stations in India which are situated far apart but have similar (if not identical) names. In general, there are no convenient connections between these pairs, such as Udaipur City (Rajasthan) and Udaipur (Tripura) or Chandrapur (Maharashtra) and Chandrapura (Jharkhand).

Except for one pair:

Gandhinagar Jaipur

and its better-known namesake

Gandhinagar Capital

The one above has now developed into an important secondary station for trains heading on the routes from Jaipur to Delhi and beyond as well as to Agra and beyond. Thus we have the Ajmer/Delhi and Jaipur/Agra Shatabdis halting there, as well as several other prominent long-distance trains.

While Gandhinagar is the capital of Gujarat, it has relatively poorer train service as it is not on a main line, but on a loop between Ahmedabad and Kalol which is used by a handful of long-distance trains as well as locals connecting it with Ahmedabad. Ahmedabad itself has secondary stations such as Sabarmati and Maninagar.

The relative importance of the two Gandhinagars can be seen from the lists of trains serving them:

http://indiarailinfo.com/departures/jaipur-gandhinagar-gadj/363

and

http://indiarailinfo.com/departures/2474?

Recently I did have reason to make a round trip between the two Gandhinagars, in connection with work at IIT Gandhinagar, which many feel is the best of the “newer” IITs.

There is, in fact, precisely one daily train which connects the two stations, as you can see below:

https://erail.in/?T=GADJ::GNC

and

https://erail.in/?T=GNC::GADJ

That is the 19031/19032 Yoga Express, which was the Ahmedabad/Haridwar Mail until 2013 and the 1/2 Delhi/Ahmedabad Mail still earlier. Until the 1970s it was considered to be the most prestigious train between Delhi and Ahmedabad, but this mantle then passed to the Ashhram Express (for the regular traveller) and the Rajdhani (for the premium traveller). Somehow the Mail never got superfast status.

There is also the Garib Rath which runs 4 times a week between Bandra Terminus and Delhi Sarai Rohilla. But taking that would be “cheating” because it does not stop at Gandhinagar Jaipur but only at Jaipur Junction.

So if you have to start from the southern half of Jaipur, Gandhinagar Jaipur is preferable.

For the hard-core timetable fan, here are the details for the up and down journeys between the two Gandhinagars:

GG1 001

GG2 001

Although the Yoga Express is supposed to be a train with reasonable prestige (as it has AC-1 accommodation), it does not have a pantry car and passengers make do with informal arrangements. For instance, the northbound train had provision for meals to be delivered at Beawar, although this did not seem to be part of the e-catering system which IRCTC tries to push.

Today is MH 370 Day

We generally know March 8 as International Women’s Day. In years to come it may well become known as MH 370 Day. On this day in 2014, a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 with 239 aboard disappeared soon after it took off from Kuala Lumpur for Beijing on a flight listed as MH 370. It was a totally routine flight until the transponder was switched off at 17.19 UTC/GMT (or 22.49 IST). Three years later, the final location and fate of the plane and its occupants remain a mystery.

Whatever is generally known is given here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Malaysia_Airlines_Flight_370

There are numerous forums/mailing lists still devoted to this incident. One of the better ones is

http://jeffwise.net/

You may also be interested in this bit I wrote about the Indian angle. It has some general information about the Andaman and Nicobar Islands:

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2015/03/07/mh-370-the-indian-angle/

 

 

Batting last in Tests in India

It is difficult to win a Test in India when the target is over 100, particularly if you are facing Indian bowling.

Here is a list of matches won with the target 100 or more on Indian grounds:

WinChase

Note that the best score by a visiting side is 276/5, by the West Indies team including Viv Richards who scored a century. Australia could successfully chase a target over 100 only once, making 195/2 coincidentally also at Bengaluru. Mark Taylor scored a century on that occasion.

Here are the highest innings scores (50 and above) in successful chases of targets of 100 or more:

Topscorechase

We see the centuries by Viv Richards and Mark Taylor here. Sachin Tendulkar is the only  other one to make a century under these conditions.

Clive Lloyd was making his Test debut, adding to his 82 in his first innings. AR Lewis was also making his debut, and was captain at this stage. He made up for his duck in his first innings.

And these are the best innings bowling figures in Tests won by the bowling side in the 4th innings, where the target was 100 or more:

Fourthinningsbowl

The top spot is Kumble’s ten-for, followed by Klusener’s 8-64 (the best by a visiting bowler) and Hirwani’s 8-75 on debut (adding to 8-61 in his first innings). Ashwin makes numerous appearances here, accompanied by several other Indian spinners.

 

 

Bowling fails in ODIs

This continues the theme of the earlier post:

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2017/02/13/bowling-fails-in-t20i-matches/

Here we look at poor performances in ODI matches. Data is correct as on 4th March 2017.

Matches involving the ICC, Asia and Africa teams are not considered.

Most runs conceded without taking a wicket (100 runs and above):

Most runs for no wkts

The list includes a number of players who have played a few Tests, including the “leader” MAR Samarasekara who played 4 Tests and took a few wickets in them but was singularly unfortunate in this format. KV Sharma and VRV Singh represent India here, though they did slightly better in Tests.

Most balls bowled without taking a wicket (90  balls and above):

Most balls for no wkts

Samarasekara again heads this list, and many of those on the first list are here as well. A couple of bowlers from East Africa’s World Cup team of 1975 are here, including DJ Pringle, father of England player Derek Pringle.

Most innings bowled without taking a wicket (4 and above):

Most innings without a wicket

Samarasekara yet again! We may as well learn more about him:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/India/content/player/50421.html

A few prominent batsmen who bowled a bit can be found here, such as David Boon, Salman Butt and VVS Laxman. They were probably called upon to bowl a few overs in a few ODIs.

Most matches without taking a wicket (150 and above):

Most matches without a wicket-general

As one may expect, the higher positions are mainly occupied by wicket-keepers (Sangakkara, Boucher and Gilchrist) who rarely bowled, although there are also some non-keepers who rarely bowled. From the above list we can see Atapattu, Gibbs and Rhodes near the top. It is worthwhile to draw up this list again for non-keepers:

Most matches without taking a wicket (100 and above) for non-keepers:

Most matches without a wicket-non keepers

Quite a number of prominent batsmen here. A special mention for Gibbs, Tharanga and Morgan who never bowled a single ball in their long ODI careers.

And finally, we look at the best economy rates of these bowlers.

Best economy rates for those who never took a wicket and bowled 90 or more balls:

Most economical bowling by no-wicket bowlers above 90 balls

This is headed by JM Patel (the same initials as those of Jasu Patel!) of Canada and includes largely unknown players, some of whom played a few Tests. The names of Samarasekara, KV Sharma and Abul Hasan should be familiar by now.

A similar analysis of Test bowlers will follow soon.