The jinx in India-Pakistan matches

Note: This was written before the start of the 2017 Champions Trophy.

It is often said that India dominates Pakistan in ICC tournaments. Hence the “Mauka Mauka” ads which aired at the beginning of the 2015 World Cup.

Let us see take a closer look at the history of these encounters. First, the World Cup:

I v P World Cup

India and Pakistan never met in the World Cups of 1975, 1979, 1983 and 1987. They were somehow always drawn in different groups so they could have met only in the semi-finals or finals. It was not until 1992 that they met in the World Cup. In that tournament all teams played each other in the knockout stage.

They met in the quarter-finals in 1996, Super Six in 1999, and a pool match in 2003. India won all these matches so the feeling of a jinx over Pakistan kept growing.

In 2007, both India and Pakistan were jinxed and failed to proceed beyond the pool stage, being displaced by Bangladesh and Ireland respectively.

In 2011, India won in the semi-final and repeated this in a pool match in 2015. So India have won all 6 encounters.

If you want to see the scorecards, open this link and click on the blue square on the extreme right.

http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/stats/index.html?class=2;filter=advanced;opposition=7;orderby=start;team=6;template=results;trophy=12;type=team;view=results

Now we go to the T20 World Championship. We will come back to the Champions Trophy at the end.

I v P T20

The teams met twice in the inaugural championship in 2007. Though the match in the pool stage was a tie, India got the winner’s points as they won in the bowl-out which was then the method used to determine the winner of a tied match.

Then India won against Pakistan in the final. The teams did not meet in 2009 and 2010. India won the next three encounters in 2012, 2014 and 2016. All of these were in the group stages and not the semi-final or final. Thus India leads 5-0 (including the tie) in the World T20 Championship.

You can see the scorecards from this link:

http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/stats/index.html?class=3;filter=advanced;opposition=7;orderby=start;team=6;template=results;trophy=89;type=team;view=results

For details of the bowl-out in the first match in 2007, see the commentary section rather than the scorecard.

But the story in the Champions Trophy is somewhat different:

I v P Chamions

India and Pakistan did not meet in 1998, 2000 or 2002 (when India shared the trophy with Sri Lanka). Pakistan won the first encounter in 2004 in the group stage. They did not meet in 2006. Pakistan won in 2009, also in the group stage. India finally won in 2013, in a group match on their way to the trophy.

So the jinx on Pakistan in ICC tournaments does not apply to Pakistan in the Champions Trophy, where they lead India 2-1. Let us see what happens when they meet on June 4. India currently has a higher ranking than Pakistan, but that has no bearing in high-tension encounters like these.

See the scorecards here:

http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/stats/index.html?class=2;filter=advanced;opposition=7;orderby=start;team=6;template=results;trophy=44;type=team;view=results

 

 

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Statistics of the Champions Trophy-2

Continuing from Part 1

Fielding: 10 or more dismissals:

Most dismissals

The leaders Sangakkara and Gilchrist are predictable. Note that McCullum and Dravid both alternated between keeping and fielding. The most by a “pure” fielder is by M Jayawardene.

Innings fielding (4 or more dismissals):

Innings fielding-above 4

The overall best is by Buttler, while the unlikely record-holder for stumpings is DO Obuya of Kenya. The “other” McCullum, who never played in Tests, has the record for non-keepers.

Fielding average (0.400 and above from 15 or more innings):

Fielding average above 0.4

Sangakkara and Boucher lead overall, while Dwayne Bravo leads among non-keepers.

All-round overall performance (see criteria in table):

AR-overall

Kallis is clearly the best here, while Afridi barely meets the qualification of an all-rounder.

All-round match performance (30+ runs and 3+ wickets):

AR Match

The best all-round performances would be that of Tendulkar and Kallis. See the scorecards below:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/66165.html

But Kallis’s performance was more crucial as it came in the final in 1998:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/66169.html

That was before the “choking” tag came up. And it remains South Africa’s only win in an ICC tournament until now.

Tail piece: It is possible that the 2017 Champions Trophy will be the last such tournament. See the news item below which is the most recent reliable report I could find. Possibly the ICC will decide on this after this tournament is over. If held, the 2021 championship is likely to be held in India.

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci-icc/content/story/1028721.html

 

 

Statistics of the Champions Trophy-1

For a quick overview of past tournaments see the previous post:

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2017/05/25/history-of-the-champions-trophy-since-1998/

Here are the statistics for all CT matches from 1998 to 2013. In case there is any doubt, it also includes the qualifying matches for the teams seeded 7th to 10th in 2006 which were played just before the “main” tournament for the top 8 teams.

Batting-most runs-250 and above:

Most runs-above 250

Chris Gayle leads M Jayawardene and Sangakkara. The two Sri Lankans have played the most CT matches (22).

Gayle, Ganguly and Gibbs (the three Gs?) have the most centuries (3).

For scores of 50+, Dravid leads with 6 while several others have 5.

Highest innings scores (all scores of 100 and above):

Highest scores-all centuries

Astle and Andy Flower lead, with Astle making his score against the US on its one Championship in 2004. As we will see later, Tendulkar’s 141* featured in one of the best all-round performances in the championship.

Batting averages (minimum 15 innings batted):

Highest averages-10 innings

Chanderpaul is just above Gayle here.

It can be seen that the highest strike rates are 88.77 by Gayle and 88.01 by Jayasuriya.

Bowling (15 or more wickets):

Most wickets-above 15

Headed by the relatively unheralded Kyle Mills followed by Muralitharan.

Best innings bowling (including all 5wi):

Innings bowling-all 5wi

Note that the only 6-wicket haul came from one of the qualifying matches in 2006.

Best bowling averages (minimum 750 balls bowled):

Bowling average-750 balls

Muralitharan has the best bowling average, economy rate and strike rate.

To be continued:

 

History of the Champions Trophy since 1998

A look at the past editions of the ICC Champions trophy, giving a quick summary of the results:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICC_Champions_Trophy

Apart from the World Cup, this is the only tournament in which all Test countries have had the opportunity to take part-though in 2017 only the top 8 are playing, with the West Indies and Zimbabwe failing to qualify. Similarly in 2009 and 2013 Bangladesh and Zimbabwe did not qualify for the top 8. In 2006 all 10 countries competed, while the “main” tournament followed immediately after the “qualifying” tournament involving the bottom 4: West Indies, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh and Zimbabwe. As things turned out West Indies and Sri Lanka qualified and the former ultimately became the runners-up.

There has been only one other multinational 50/60-over tournament (other than the Champions Trophy and World Cup) where all Test countries participated. This was the Benson & Hedges World Championship in Australia in 1984-85:

http://static.espncricinfo.com/db/ARCHIVE/1980S/1984-85/OD_TOURNEYS/WCC/

All 7 Test-playing countries at that time took part. These included Sri Lanka but not the exiled South Africa. You might say this was an unofficial World Cup.

Note that the only ICC tournaments won by South Africa (1998) and New Zealand (2000) can be found in the records of the Champion’s Trophy).

Footnote: If anyone wants to play around on Statsguru, they can select “ICC Champions Trophy (ICC Knockout)” in the Tournament heading, to get the aggregates for all these matches from 1998 onwards. I will be doing this in more detail over the next few days.

For the moment, the most matches played are 22 by M. Jayawardene and Sangakkara. The most runs scored is 791 by Gayle, and the most wickets 28 by the lesser-known KD Mills of New Zealand. The most dismissals are 33 by Sangakkara.

The best individual scores are 145* by NJ Astle and 145 by Andy Flower.

The best innings bowling is 6-14 by MF Mahroof of Sri Lanka. No one else has taken more than 5 wickets in an innings.

 

 

Landmark-the 4000th Test century (Updated in July 2017)

 

During the long break between Test matches between mid-May and early August, one can look back at the landmarks passed during the 2016-17 season. Practically any Test series which starts between May and September is considered to be the 2017 season.

One landmark which went unnoticed was the neat round figure of 4000 Test centuries which was achieved by Roston Chase in his ultimately futile 101* in the fourth innings at Roseau.

Here are the landmark centuries, which can be easily identified through Statsguru. Here we have included the Aus v ICC World XI Test which started on 14/10/2005. And Matthew Hayden scored 111 in this match. Some may feel that this should not be counted as a “real” Test. That correction can also be made.

For the moment, we do include Hayden’s century in the list.

100th: J.Sharp, 105, Eng v Aus, match starting 09/08/1909

500th: RN Harvey, 178, Aus v SA, 31/12/1949

1000th: WM Lawry, 205, Aus v WI, 26/12/1968

1500th: GS Chappell, 115, Aus v Eng, 10/12/1982

2000th: ME Waugh, 137, Aus v Eng, 05/08/1993

2500th: RT Ponting, 144, Aus v Eng, 16/08/2001

3000th: W Jaffer, 100, Ind v Eng, 01/03/2006

3500th: KC Sangakkara, 168, SL v SA, 26/12/2011

4000th: RL Chase, 101*, WI v Pak, 10/05/2017

Note the high proportion of Australian batsmen in these landmark centuries.

Now if you disregard the ICC XI Test and Hayden’s century, the numbers from 3000 onward will change:

3000th: AN Cook, 104*,Eng v Ind, 01/03/2006 (and Jaffer moves to 2999. This was Cook’s Test debut)

3500th: TT Samaraweera, 102, SL v SA, 26/12/2001 (Sangakkara moves to 3499)

4000th: JT Root, 190, Eng v SA, 06/07/2017 (Chase moves to 3999)

Afterthought: These landmarks were found using Statsguru’s listing, going by the date of start of the Test and then in alphabetical order of the player’s names. But the order of completion of the century can be different. My old friend Sreeram Acehbdfg points out that if you take the order of completion of the century, then it was IM Chappell (165) who scored the 1000th century rather than his team-mate WM Lawry, in the Test between Aus and WI starting 26/12/1968.

Similarly, No 2000 appears to be R Mahanama, 151, SL v Ind, 04/08/1993. There might be other instances like this.

 

Long and short names of stations in India

Most readers will know the identity of the stations with the longest and shortest names in India.

Copyrights of all these pictures rest with their creators.

We take a look at some other long names, after the undisputed leader;

Venkat

Here are some others. They are from both North and South:

periyanaikanpalayamCheruvu MadhavaramOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERATondalagopavaramOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAGiani Zail...Romana Albel SinghFatehabad C'watiganj

KolhapurNP MurailNPA Shivrampally

This category involves initials, which would make a long name if spelt in full:

BEML NagarVOC

This one is not that long, but may be the most difficult to pronounce by non locals:

Shrungavarapukota

As for the shortest names, there are two with two letters. One is well known, the other is not so well known though it is odd:

IbOd

The person seen in the “odd” sign is Vimlesh Chandra, a railway engineer who has collected a vast number of pictures of stations and other items of railway interest.

There are several other stations with 3-letter names:

AitAraBapBarDETOrrPen

 

And this one used to have 3 letters, which was changed to 4 letters for obvious reasons:

Baad

This listing is not intended to be comprehensive, but does include the longest name (Venkatanarasimharajuvaripeta) and the shortest names (Ib and Od).

Also see this for a global viewpoint:

http://www.railwaystationlists.co.uk/information/trivia.pdf

 

 

Old and new stations on the Lumding-Silchar line

Please refer to this earlier post, where the changes in the alignment in the Haflong area are described.

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2015/06/25/bg-link-to-silchar-is-finally-ready/

Earlier the old and new alignments could be seen on Google Maps. Now only the new alignment is shown.

A number of stations are no longer on the route and have thus vanished from the railway map. And some new stations have come up.

Here are pictures of the some of the old and new stations. Copyrights of the pictures are with their creators:

Old stations (The one in the top left is Bagetar):

BagetarHaflong HillHarangajaoJatingaLower Haflong

New stations:

Jatinga LumpurNew HaflongNew Harangajao

 

And here is another interesting sign you may see near Jatinga:

Jatinga village