Shakib Al Hasan’s all round feat

Bangladesh’s first Test victory against Australia came in their fifth attempt, having lost all four of the previous Tests. Two were in Australia and two were at home.

The main architect of this victory was Shakib Al Hasan with a fine all-round performance, which we will look at in more detail:

While the feat of a century + fiver is well documented, the “converse” of a fifty and ten wickets is not. But it can easily be got from Statsguru.

Fifty and ten wickets in a Test:

50 +10wm

Only 28 such instances in all Tests. The only ones who have done this on more than one occasion are Sir Richard Hadlee (3 times) and now Shakib Al Hasan (twice). Kapil and India’s false knight also make appearances (while R. Ashwin does not). Moeen Ali was the last entry before Shakib.

Kapil and Jadeja are the only ones from India.

If you take the still rarer feat of a fifty and two five-fors:

Fifty plus two fivers

Only 14 instances-including two by Sir Richard and two by Shakib. None from India.

While we are at it, let us take the analogous case of two fifties and one five-for:

2 fifties and fiver

Only 14 instances, including four from India. Mankad, Umrigar and Surti could not save their team from defeat, while B. Kumar’s neglected batting helped in a draw.

No one has achieved this more than once.

No one has scored two fifties AND two five-fors in a Test. From the above we see that the nearest approaches were by Davidson in 1960 (44, 80, 5wi and 6wi) and Vettori in 2008 (55*, 76, 5wi and 4wi).

There have, however been four instances of 100 runs and 10 wickets in a match-in which Shakib figures again:

100 runs and 10 wickets

Advertisements

The predecessors of Gurmeet Ram Raheem Singh

Quite a mouthful. You might as well call him by his stage name MSG, which is more commonly known as monosodium glutamate, which is supposed to be harmful to health.

There are, however, a number of real cases of multi-religious names. One is Major-General George Bharat Singh, who was prominent in the 1965 war. Unfortunately there is no suitable reference on the net, though you will find his name easily enough through Google.

There was a lesser-known but moderately successful cricketer named Ashish Winston Zaidi, who played for UP in the Ranji Trophy for many years:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/india/content/player/36137.html

The Indian film industry was fond of titles like this. The best known is “Amar Akbar Anthony”, but there were also “John Jani Janardhan” (with Rajnikanth, no less) and “Ram Robert Rahim” in various languages around the same time.

And the song “Love Charger” evoked memories of the chargers used by Papillon and his friends.

“From the beginning of the book you’re left in no doubt as to how hard you needed to be to survive. On the boat heading for South America each prisoner carries his own ‘charger’, a slim metal cylinder for storing your cash – cash that would be sorely needed in order to make a break.

I kissed this three-and-a-half-inch , thumb-thick tube before shoving it in my anus. It went up high into my large intestine. It was part of me.”

 

“Sir” Geoffrey and the real knights

(Don’t worry, there are no jokes about Sir Ravindra Jadeja here)

Just in case you missed this:

http://www.yorkpress.co.uk/sport/national/15487692.Geoffrey_Boycott_to_continue_on_TMS_after_apologising_for____unacceptable____comment/

How far was he justified in saying that it was much easier to be knighted if you were a West Indian cricketer rather than an English cricketer? These are the facts:

Firstly, the British sovereign proclaims someone a knight based on the recommendations of the government of the day. The gentleman concerned would be a citizen of the U.K. or one of the other countries which presently regard the British sovereign (presently Queen Elizabeth II) as their head of state. The countries of interest here are Australia, New Zealand and some (but not all) of the countries of the West Indies. Canada is also included, although it has not produced any famous cricketers yet. Those countries who do not regard the Queen as the Head of State include many Commonwealth countries such as India and its neighbors, besides South Africa. This should make it clear:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/States_headed_by_Elizabeth_II

It appears that the governments of the West Indies countries take their own decisions as to who is to be knighted.

So here is a list of those who were knighted for their services to cricket, besides some cricketers who were knighted for other reasons:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cricketers_who_were_knighted

Another article on cricketing knights from the West Indies:

http://www.bbc.com/sport/cricket/26392726

Another general article which summarizes the topic:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/magazine/content/story/60096.html

Now, even the list from England includes some names which most reasonably well-informed cricket fans of today would not have heard of (e.g. Lacey, Toone and Leveson Gower whose first-class cricket careers were nothing exceptional-even though the last named played 3 Tests).

Among the West Indians, all of them would be considered as among the most eminent cricketers in the last few decades. The only exception might be Richie Richardson who did not have as successful a career:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/magazine/content/story/60096.html

(Even so, he played 86 Tests and scored 16 centuries, with almost 6000 runs at an average of 44) and was captain for some time.

So was Geoffrey justified in complaining? A difficult question, but he probably was wrong. And his way of putting it was highly politically incorrect. Perhaps he should go back to chasing lesser-known Indian actresses.

Pink-ball Test records

A total of five day-night Tests (or pink-ball Tests) have been played until now. All 5 have had results:

Results

It can be seen that all 5 Tests have been won by the hosts (if you consider Pakistan to be the host at Dubai).

While we do not have enough of a sample set to seriously look at aggregates and averages, we can certainly look at innings and match performances. We start with

Batting: Highest innings (50 and above):

Innings above 50

There are already an impressive array of centuries including a double and a triple.

Bowling: best innings bowling (4wi and above):

Bowling-innings

Bishoo’s 8-for did not help his side to win, though Hazlewood’s 6wi did.

Bowling: best match bowling (6wm and above):

Bowling-matches

Bishoo and Hazlewood lead once again. Bishoo has the only 10wm so far.

Fielding: best innings fielding (3 dismissals or more):

Fielding-innings

Wade and Nevill have the most dismissals (5 and 4) while a few non-keepers have 3 catches.

Fielding: best match fielding (6 dismissals or more):

Fielding-match

Nevill and Wade both made 7 dismissals, while SPD Smith has 4 catches as a non-keeper.

All-round: 50 and 4wi in the match:

AR-match

Only one instance, with Starc making 53 and 4-80.

 

 

Sri Lanka-India Tests (Aug 2017)-2

Continuing from Part 1, we take up fielding records.

Most dismissals (10 and above):

Most dismissals

Azharuddin leads here with 27 dismissals, followed by Dhoni who played relatively few Tests against Sri Lanka. P. Jayawardene has the most stumpings (8). Dhoni and Amal Silva the most catches by keepers (21) and Azharuddin the most catches by a non-keeper (27) followed by M. Jayawardene with 22.  Rahane, Saha and Rahul are also here.

Most dismissals in an innings (4 and above):

Innings dismissals

Amal Silva, who had a surprisingly short career, has the most dismissals in an innings (6). Rahane has 5, which is a share in the world record for innings catches by a non-keeper. Dickwella and Dhoni also represent the current players.

There is also S Viswanath whose Test career was limited to three matches against Sri Lanka.

Most dismissals in a match (5 and above):

Match dismissals

Amal Silva had a short but meteoric career with 9 dismissals in successive Tests. He played only 9 Tests in all, scoring a century as well as taking 9 dismissals against India in one Test:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/player/50432.html

http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/16848/scorecard/63410/Sri-Lanka-vs-India-2nd-Test   

Oddly enough, Silva’s Cricinfo profile does not have a picture of him. Even the Wikipedia article does not have one. Anyway here is one from a Sri Lankan newspaper:

http://www.sundaytimes.lk/101114/Sports/spt15.html 

Then we have AM Rahane taking 8 catches in a match, a world record which he does not have to share:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/11331/scorecard/895773/Sri-Lanka-vs-India-1st-Test

Unfortunately, India lost that Test but went on to win that series 2-1.

Saha also makes this list from the current players, while NV Ojha made 5 dismissals in what is likely to be his only Test.

Best dismissal rates (Minimum 20 innings. minimum rate 0.400).

Dismissal rate

Azharuddin leads here, while no pure keeper has played enough. Sangakkara, who played both as a keeper and fielder, is second. Dhoni and Saha have not played enough to qualify.

All-round performances:

Overall (see criteria):

AR overall

Only Kumble and Muralitharan qualify with these modest criteria-and one can hardly call them all-rounders.

Match performance (fifty and 5wi):

AR Match

Until this series, only Malinga qualified though his Test batting average is less than 12 and he scored his only Test fifty in this match. In the second Test of this series, both Ashwin and Jadeja achieved this mark. It is rare for two players from the same side to score a fifty and take a fiver in the same Test, but it has happened a few times before.

To be precise, this was only the third time in all Tests where two players from the same side scored a 50 and took a fiver in the same match. The two previous examples were:

Adelaide, 11 Jan,1895: Giffen and A Trott of Aus vs England

Nottingham, Jul 29, 2011: Broad and Bresnan of Eng vs India

Interestingly, there have been 9 examples of players from opposing sides who took a 50 and a fiver in the same match. The first was at the Oval, starting on August 11, 1902 where the adversaries were H Trumble and GH Hirst, in the first ever one-wicket victory.

The most recent instance was at Chittagong starting on Oct 17, 2008 where it was Vettori vs Shakib.

 

 

Sri Lanka-India Tests (Aug 2017)-1

At the close of the series in Sri Lanka in August 2017, the teams had played 41 Tests.

Overall, India has won 19, Sri Lanka 7 and 15 were drawn.

In Sri Lanka, India has won 9, Sri Lanka 7 and 8 were drawn.

In India, India has won 10, Sri Lanka none and 7 were drawn.

Sri Lanka has won Tests in all countries (including UAE) except India and Australia.

Starting with batting records:

Most runs (500 and above):

Ind-SL runs

Mathews and Dhawan are the only current players here. Kohli and other current players have not played enough in this series.

Tendulkar has the most centuries (9) followed by M. Jayawardene (6).

Tendulkar also has the most scores above 50 (15) followed by M. Jayawardene (14) and Dravid (12).

Highest scores (140 and above):

Innings scores

Dhawan, Pujara and Karunaratne are in this list but are not near the top. Chandimal had done well in 2015.

Highest batting averages (Minimum 20 innings, all instances):

Batting avg

M. Jayawardene tops the average but Sangakkara is somewhat lower down. Azharuddin’s position is higher than one would have guessed. At the bottom end, Muralitharan has a better average than Kumble and Harbhajan who are generally considered to be better batsmen. In fact, Muralitharan made his only Test 50 against India.

Among current players, only Mathews appears as most current players have not played enough in this series. That also applies to some other big names like Jayasuriya.

Bowling records:

Most wickets (20 and above):

Most wkts

Muralitharan leads by a big margin, ahead of Kumble who also leads the next-placed Harbhajan by a big margin. Ashwin and Herath are the only current players here, though Ishant Sharma may possibly play in the future.

Muralitharan has 7 fivers, followed by Kumble with 4.

Harbhajan, Kumble and Muralitharan have each taken two ten-fors.

Best innings bowling (all cases of 6wi and above):

Best innings

Only N Pradeep from the recent series, although Herath and Ashwin did better in 2015.

Best match bowling (all cases of 9wm and above):

Best match bowling

No example from the current series, although Ashwin had done better in 2015.

Bowling averages (Minimum 2000 balls, all instances):

Bowl Avg

Kapil tops the averages, with even Kumble surpassing Muralitharan. The only current player here (Herath) has a rather poor average. Others such as Ashwin and Jadeja have not bowled enough.

We can see that the best averages are by Kapil (26.55) and Kumble (31.20).

The best economy rates are by RK Chauhan (2.28) and Kapil (2.64).

The best strike rates are by Kapil (60.3) and Muralitharan (66.8).

To be continued.

 

Clean sweeps in Test series

Clean sweeps of Test series of 3,4 and 5 matches are not as rare as one may think. Here is Cricinfo’s listing:

http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/records/283942.html

India has recorded clean sweeps at home earlier (and have faced 5-0 sweeps against England and the West Indies as well, but never at home). India had already won against England 3-0 in 1992-93, against Sri Lanka 3-0 (all by an innings) in 1993-94, against Australia 4-0 in 2012-2013 and now 3-0 against Sri Lanka in Sri Lanka.

This is not, however, the first time India have won 3 Tests in an away series. They defeated New Zealand 3-1 in 1967-68, achieving India’s first Test and series win outside India. This series is often forgotten, probably because of New Zealand’s low standing at that time and also because India had just endured a 3-0 loss in England followed by a 4-0 loss in Australia.

There were also mini-sweeps (2-0) by India in Bangladesh (2004-05 and 2009-10) and in Zimbabwe (2005-06). Similarly India lost 2-0 to South Africa at home in 1999-2000.

The current series included wins by 304 runs followed by two innings wins (though the first Test was effectively an innings defeat as the total of Sri Lanka’s two innings was less than India’s first innings total). Again, this is not new as India had won all 3 Tests by an innings at home against the same opposition in 1993-94. Other examples of this kind include the West Indies losing all 3 Tests by an innings in their first series against England in 1928.

West Indies is the only team to win 4-0 or 5-0 away. They won 5-0 against England in England in 1984, and followed this with 5-0 at home in 1985-86 against the same opponents.

There was a tinge of black humour in reportage of these West Indies victories in the 1980s. Earlier the term “whitewash” was commonly used for a clean sweep, so it was but natural that a 5-0 victory by the West Indies would be called a “blackwash”, as in 1984 and 1985-86. By 1988 England had improved a bit and lost the 5-Test home series 4-0. This was dubbed a “dark grey wash”.

3-0 sweeps away from home are not too common. They are:

Eng in NZ, 1962-63

Aus in NZ, 1999-2000

Aus in SL, 2003-04

Aus in SA, 2005-06

And in neutral venues:

Aus v Pak, 2002-03

Pak v Eng, 2011-12.

There have been many near-clean sweeps of 4-0 and 4-1 in 5-Test series. In the 6-Test series which were played between the 1970s and 1990s, we have two examples of 5-1 margins:

Aus v WI in Aus, 1975-76

Eng v Aus in Aus, 1978-79