The Lord’s Dishonour Boards

You know all about the Test honours boards at Lord’s, which have been  covered in this blog a few times.

You also know who never did well while playing in several matches at Lord’s: https://abn397.wordpress.com/2016/10/28/those-who-missed-the-bus-at-lords/

Now imagine the concept of a Dishonour Board. For batting, this would be anyone who gets a genuine pair (dismissed for a duck in both innings) at Lord’s:

Dismissed for a duck at Lord’s:

Lord's Pair

India contributed Murali Vijay and Kuldeep Yadav in the 2018 Test. Earlier that season, Stuart Broad was dismissed for a silver pair (out second ball in each innings). No instance could be found of a golden pair (first ball in each innings) and bronze pair (third ball).

As you may guess, most of these players are not specialist batsmen (though Prior, Stokes and Murali Vijay are exceptions).

Botham’s pair in 1981 was the final trigger to his dismissal from the captaincy, when England trailed 0-1 in the second Test of an Ashes series. Brearley came back as captain, and the rest was history  as England won three Tests in a row to win 3-1.

Now we look at those who bowled in each innings of a match and had match figures of  0-100 or worse:

Lord's conceding 100 for 0.

The most runs conceded are 143 by West Indian Fidel Edwards and 142 by Australian AC Agar. The only instance from India is that of Shastri, who came up against Gooch’s 333 and 123 in 1990.

And finally, we look at wicket-keepers who did not make a dismissal after fielding in both innings of a match:

Lord's no dismissals

Leslie Ames appears here three times in the 1930s. A number of other prominent keepers ranging from Waite to de Villiers are here.

Now someone like Andy Zaltzman can take this up further and put up the Dishonour Boards at Lord’s.

 

 

They saw only victories in their Test careers

These are the only players (who played in 5 or more Tests) whose team won all the tests in their career:

All win

Apart from Baptiste (to a limited extent), none of them had particularly distinguished Test careers. For instance, Lord Hawke was a specialist batsman whose Test batting average was under 10.  While GJ Bailey was a good limited-overs batsman he made only one fifty in Tests. They were fortunate in being in the right team at the right time-which was particularly true of Eldine Baptiste: http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/player/51211.html

But there were others who had even longer winning streaks at the start of their careers.

Adam Gilchrist played 96 Tests, of which his team won 73, lost 11 and drew 12. They won all of his first 15 Tests from 5 Nov 1999 to 27 Feb 2001, until Harbhajan, VVS and Dravid spoilt Australia’s party at Kolkata.

Records of this type are not well documented, but the next in line seem to be Stuart Clark and Tim Bresnan with victories in each of their first 13 Tests.

Clark’s winning streak was from 16 Mar 2006 to 2 Jan 2008, and his career figures were 18 wins, 2 losses and 4 draws. He appears to have some Indian connection as his parents were Anglo-Indians who had migrated to Australia. As in Gilchrist’s case, his successful run ended when India won against Australia. This time it was at Perth.

Bresnan’s winning streak was from 6 May 2009 to 25 May 2012. He finished with 15 wins, 4 losses and 4 draws. He is unlikely to play Tests again.

More recently, Imran Khan (II) and “Palindrome Man” Aiden Markram saw victory in each of their first 5 Tests. While the latter is still a key player for his side, the former seems to have finished with 9 Tests with 6 wins, 2 losses and 1 draw.

More odd station signs around India

(Copyright of the pictures rest with the respective photographers)

If one looks at the use of words in English, Hindi and other languages on station signs then many inconsistencies can be found. Here are samples from different parts of the country.

North Lakhimpur

We start with this place in a somewhat remote part of Assam. North is transcribed into Hindi, but one can make out that it is “Uttor” in Assamese.

It is a normal practice to use the Hindi word “Chhavni” for Cantonment. Not everywhere. Here are two examples from Karnataka, where both Chhavni and Hindi Cantonment are used:

Our next stop is the station formerly known as Chakki Bank and now Pathankot Cantt. See the Hindi and Punjabi signs at the same station:

Hope the concerned persons have made up their mind now.

Similarly at Nellore South where both Dakshin and Hindi South are/were used:

(Can someone clarify what is written in Telugu?)

Elsewhere in South India, a standard pattern for Hindi words is not followed:

bengaluru eastkannur southernakulam townernakulam jncoimbatore north

Note that South and Town have been transcribed (not translated) into Malayalam. (Can someone clarify what is written in Kannada for Bengaluru East?)

Various forts:

ankai killachennai fortbekal fort

In Chennai, the Tamil word has been transcribed into Hindi. In Ankai Killa, the suffix is in Hindi unlike in the other places.

Now to some well-known stations in Assam which are now closed:

Lower Haflong closedHaflong Hill

The words Lower and Hill have been transcribed into Hindi and Assamese.

There are many “New” stations on the NF zone, but only one “Old”:New Cooch BeharNew TinsukiaOld Malda

Here the words New and Old have been transcribed into Hindi, Bengali and Assamese.

But for variety we have:

New Amravati is in Maharashtra, hence the top line is supposed to be in Marathi.

Our last stop is at Agra, which has Cantt, Fort and City:

Agra FortAgra CityAgra Cantt

Here at least a consistent pattern has been followed.

But you can see that the usage of English words in Hindi and other languages is quite arbitrary all over the country.

 

Odd station signs in Chennai

Note these station signs where the Hindi inscription seems to have been taken from Tamil rather than English:

Now compare the sign of Park Town above (top right) with the nearby Park:

Chennai Park

One wonders about the logic.

Finally, a similar one from Coimbatore:

Coimbatore North

The Rishabh and Rahul show

(Figures as on August 23, 2018)

While Virat Kohli was Man of the Match, the twin fielding feats of Rishabh Pant and KL Rahul played a large part in India’s victory at Nottingham.

First we look at fielding performances on debut, with reference to Rishabh:

Innings fielding on debut:

Innings fielding debut

Rishabh’s 5 dismissals is the best for India on debut by a wicketkeeper, though Yajurvindra had taken 5 as a non-keeper. A few Indian keepers had earlier taken 4 catches in an innings on their debut.

Match fielding on debut:

Match fielding debut

Here, both Rishabh and Yajurvindra made 7 dismissals on debut. Rishabh’s 7 is the best by any Indian keeper on debut. Some Indian keepers had made 5 dismissals on debut.

Note that Yajurvindra’s 5 in the innings and 7 in the match remain the best by any debutant non-keeper.

We look at fielding performances by non-keepers.

(This is for all matches, not merely on debut).

Innings fielding:

Innings fielding non keeper

The world record is 5, shared by the fielders listed above. The first to achieve this was VY Richardson, maternal grandfather of the Chappell brothers. Several current and recent players can be seen. KL Rahul is one of many who took 4 catches (in the 4th innings, to add to the 3 he took in the first innings).

Match fielding:

Match fielding non keeper

While current player Rahane is the only one to take 8 catches in a match (which, by the way, India lost), KL Rahul is one of several to take 7 catches. Note that no one had taken 7 catches in a match until Greg Chappell in 1974.

 

 

Best innings fielding on Test debut

This is being written in the middle of the 3rd Eng v Ind Test.

These figures may have concerned the player’s first or second innings as  a fielder.

Innings catches debut

Note the only non-keeper Yajurvindra Singh, who took as many catches as Rishabh Pant.

He had a short career of 4 Tests, as did Maclean.

Emery played only one Test, as he had the misfortune to play in the Healy era.

Six off first ball on debut-and soon vanished

When Rishabh Pant hit his second ball on Test debut for six, the keepers of arcane statistics pointed out that this had only been surpassed by New Zealander Mark Craig, who had done this on his first ball while making his debut in 2014. More importantly, he took 8 wickets in the match and played a major role in one of New Zealand’s rare victories in the West Indies.

See: http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/content/player/497543.html

and this extract from Steve Lynch’s column:

“Has anyone hit his first ball in Test cricket for six? And how about his last ball? asked Julian Metcalfe from England
The only player so far to hit the first ball he received in Test cricket for six was the New Zealand offspinner Mark Craig, who cracked Sulieman Benn of West Indies over the long-off boundary in Kingston in June 2014. In the field that day, probably nodding approvingly, was Chris Gayle, who remains the only man to hit the very first ball of a Test match for six – from the debutant Sohag Gazi of Bangladesh in Mirpur in 2012. The only man known to have hit his last ball in Test cricket for six was another West Indian, Wayne Daniel, against Australia in Port-of-Spain in 1984.”

Craig seemed set for a long career, particularly as he soon became one of  the few to make the double of a fifty and ten wickets in a Test during his first year of international cricket.

http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/stats/index.html?class=1;filter=advanced;orderby=start;qualmin1=1;qualmin2=10;qualval1=fifty_plus;qualval2=wickets;template=results;type=allround;view=match

However, his Test career lasted little over two years and he is no longer in contention for the NZ team. Probably this was more because his bowling figures had declined, though he continued to score useful runs in the lower order.

He played 15 Tests and no ODIs and T20Is.

Here you can see his Test career (2014-2016):

http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/player/497543.html?class=1;template=results;type=allround;view=match