The highest lone five-for

After looking at those who scored the highest lone century, we look at those who took only one five-for and see who did the best.

This includes all 7wi and better.

The highest here is by Lance Klusener, who was making his debut. He never scored a five-for in Tests again, but did do so in ODIs. Second is SJ Snooke who had a shorter career. But he did take a ten-for, unlike Klusener. Then there is JJ Krejza who took 12 wickets on debut (which his team lost) and played only one more Test

There are many who do better on debut than in their later matches. Here we have Klusener, Krejza, Kendall (in the very first Test), Zahid, de Lange, Ashley (only one innings in his career).

Among current players there is only KC Brathwaite who bowled occasionally until his “breakthrough”.

From India, there are Agarkar (6/41), Ramchand (6/49) ,Abid Ali (6/55 on debut) and Shinde (6/91).

Now we consider the best innings figures by those who took only one four-for.

The first few names also appear in the first list: Emmett, de Lange, Hornibrook, Ashley and Brathwaite.

Debutants include Ashley (only test and innings), Kirtley and Coldwell.

Current players include Brathwaite and ML Cummings (not Pat !).

From India there are Agarkar, Ramchand and Shinde.

Agarkar’s only score above 50 was a century, along with his only 4+wi was a 6-for.

The highest lone century

There are players who score several Test centuries. And some score only one. Here we look at the highest innings by players who scored exactly one century:

Led by KK Nair’s 303*, and followed by RE Foster’s 287 on debut and Z Crawley’s recent 267.

Apart from Foster, Mayers, Kuruppu and Conway have the highest lone centuries on debut.

From India, KK Nair is accompanied by ML Apte and NR Mongia.

What about those who made only one score above fifty?

This list is still headed by KK Nair, with the next being D Lloyd and B Kuruppu.. They all made full use of their opportunities once they crossed fifty.

Nair’s second highest score is only 26. For Lloyd it is 49 and for Kuruppu 46. Lloyd started off with 46 and 214* against India’s weak 1974 team, and thus temporarily had a Test average of 260.00 which dipped sharply during the Ashes tour later that year.

There are a few debutants here: Kuruppu, Bannerman, SC Griffith and Hartigan among others.

In recent years there have been Nair, Patterson and Yasir Shah.

From India, Nair is accompanied by A Ratra, RH Shodhan, Agarkar and Pataudi (Sr)

As we will see, Agarkar made only one score above fifty (and made it a century) and only one four-for (which was a 6-for).

Note that the above list includes relatively few lower-order batters. Most are recognized batsmen who got few opportunities. (Ganteaume’s single Test and a few others who played less than 5 Tests.)

Afterthought: KK Nair may well have the record for the highest ratio of highest and second-highest scores: 303/26 = 11.65

Apart from Nair, Sobers (365*) and RB Simpson (311) made their first century a triple. Unlike him, they scored many more centuries after that.

Kings of the fourth-innings chase (Revised-Sep 2021)-Pt 3

This continues from https://abn397.wordpress.com/2021/09/25/kings-of-the-fourth-innings-chase-revised-sep-2021-pt-2/

Here we look at the best fielding performances in the fourth innings for the winning team.

Most dismissals: (15 and above):

Headed by Gilchrist, Haddin and Healy, who kept for Australia for most Tests between 1989 and 2015.

Current players include de Kock, the just-retired Watling, Bairstow, Paine and Pant.

India’s players are headed by Pant, followed by non-keeper Kohli, Dhoni and another non-keeper Dravid.

Most dismissals in an innings (5 and above):

Watling is the only one with 6 dismissals, followed by many with 5. Apart from GC Smith, no non-keeper has taken more than 4 catches. Healy appears here twice.

Of special note is KS More’s 5 stumpings. This is the world record for stumpings in an innings. 4 of these were off debutant Hirwani.

Most dismissals per innings (Minimum 15 innings):

Headed by de Kock, closely followed by Haddin.

The best by current players are by de Kock, Bairstow, Buttler and Stokes.

For India, the best are by Dravid and Kohli-both non-keepers. Indian keepers (apart from More) do not seem to have done well in winning matches in the fourth innings.

Kings of the fourth-innings chase (Revised-Sep 2021)-Pt 2

Continued from: https://abn397.wordpress.com/2021/09/24/kings-of-the-fourth-innings-chase-revised-sep-2021-pt-1/

We now look at the bowlers who have been most successful in winning matches in the fourth innings.

Most wickets (35 and above):

Warne leads with 103, followed by late developer Herath and McGrath.

Herath has the most five-fors (11) followed by Muralitharan (7)

Current players are headed by Lyon (68 wickets), Broad and Ashwin.

The most wickets by Indian players are by Ashwin (65), Kumble (51) and Ishant Sharma (45).

Best innings bowling (including all 8wi and above):

The best here is 10-74 by Kumble. (Laker’s 10-wicket haul was in the third innings). Then there is 9-86 by Sarfraz Nawaz which included a spell of 7-1.

The best innings figures in recent times include 8-60 by RL Chase in 2019 and 8-63 by R Herath in 2016.

India is represented by Kumble and debutant Hirwani. (Another famous debutant Bob Massie had bowled in the third innings).

Finally we look at career figures for bowling in the fourth innings of wins:

Best bowling averages in wins in the 4th innings (Minimum 1500 balls bowled):

These are all the 25 bowlers who crossed the cutoff of 1500 balls bowled.

McGrath leads here with 14.24, followed by Herath, Ashwin and Kumble.

The best by current players are Ashwin (16.03), MM Ali, Starc , Ishant Sharma, Broad, Anderson and a few more with 1500+ balls bowled.

The best averages for India are by Ashwin, Kumble, Ishant Sharma, Jadeja and Harbhajan.

The best economy rates are by Illingworth (1.70) and Jadeja

The best strike rates are by Waqar Younis and MM Ali (32.9 with Waqar slightly ahead).

Kings of the fourth-innings chase (Revised-Sep 2021)-Pt 1

The fourth-innings chase is often regarded as the ultimate challenge for a batter. Let us see who have done the best in successful chases.

Most runs: (400+):

GC Smith is the clear leader here. He also has the most centuries (4) and most 50+ scores (10, followed by contemporaries Hayden, Ponting and JL Langer with 7). Also note CG Greenidge’s 214*.

Tendulkar, Dravid and Sehwag have the most runs for India.

Williamson and Karunaratne are the only current players here, with Amla, Cook and Younis from recent years.

Bradman is not here (but when he batted, a fourth innings chase was often not needed by Australia).

Highest scores in these cases (115 and above):

A total of 76 centuries have been scored here.

Only two double centuries, with KR Mayers scoring his on debut. The next highest in recent years was 153* by K Perera in 2019. There are Morris and Bradman in the same Test at Leeds in 1948, which was the only successful 400+ chase until India followed in 1976. (Years later, MA Butcher emulated Bradman’s 173* at Leeds).

The highest from India are not in the above list.

Viswanath (112) and Gavaskar (102) made their centuries in the same match in 1976, while Tendulkar and Laxman have made 103*.

Highest averages (Minimum 15 innings):

These 21 entries are the only ones with 15 or more innings. GC Smith leads here as well, with Ponting close behind.

From the recent past there are Cook and Amla. Tendulkar, Dravid and Sehwag represent India.

Kisrsten and Dravid are among those who did not score a century, although Hutton has a 98*.

We will take up bowling in 4th-innings wins in the next part.

West to East by Metre Gauge in 1976

In this post https://abn397.wordpress.com/2021/09/18/delhi-to-madras-by-metre-gauge-in-1976/

we had explored an all-MG route between Delhi and Madras which existed in 1976, as well as the extremities of metre gauge at Kot Kapura and Tiruchendur at that time,

In 1976, the extremities of metre gauge were Varvala (near Okha) in the west and Lekhapani (near Ledo) in the east. These were also the extremities of IR as broad gauge had not spread to these areas yet.

Here, we travel from Okha (the western-most terminus) to Lekhapani.

Names are as they were in 1976. There do not seem to have been any instances of inflated distances on this route.

        WEST TO EAST BY METRE GAUGE IN 1976
 
 
Km 
0Okha 
29Dwarka 
141Kanalus 
166Jamnagar 
247Rajkot 
289Wankaner 
365Surendranagar 
428Viramgam 
493Mahesana 
563Palanpur 
616Abu Road 
781Marwar Jn 
869Beawar 
921Ajmer 
1001Phulera 
1056Jaipur 
1147Bandikui 
1244Bharatpur 
1272AchhneraEnd of WR 
1307Mathura 
1358Hathras Road 
1412Kasganj 
1520Farukhabad 
1660Kanpur Central 
1731Lucknow 
1763Barabanki 
1791Burhwal 
1852Gonda 
2006Gorakhpur 
2076Bhatni 
2125Siwan 
2185Chhapra Jn 
2240Sonpur 
2245Hajipur 
2316Bachwara 
2332Barauni 
2388Khagaria 
2511KatiharEnd of NER 
2551Barsoi 
2606Kishanganj 
2713Siliguri Jn 
2761New Mal 
2876Alipurduar Jn
2948Fakiragram
2985New Bongaigaon
3095Rangiya
3158Gauhati
3250Chaparmukh
3339Lumding
3408Dimapur
3516Mariani
3570Simaluguri
3671Tinsukia
3725Ledo
3734LekhapaniNFR

As you can see, this route passes through only three of the existing zones at that time.

It passed through the states of GJ, RJ, UP, BR, WB, AS and NL.

While the Sonpur-Muzaffarpur-Samastipur-Barauni section was already broad gauge, most of the long-distance trains continued to run on MG as the BG lines were too limited in these areas.

The Ledo-Lekhapani section had very limited services of one pair of trains per day. It was opened in the late 1950s after conversion of a privately-owned 2’0″ NG line. Later, it was not found worthwhile to convert to BG so Ledo remains the eastern-most passenger station. The BG line continues a little further east to Tirap Siding where coal is loaded on goods trains.

A possible set of trains for this route (from 1976) are:

Okha-Mahesana Janata Express to Mahesana

Various express trains to Jaipur or Bandikui.

Various express/passenger trains to Achhnera or Agra Fort.

Vaishali Express to Siliguri. (Yes, at that time it started from Agra Fort).

Various express trains to Tinsukia (Assam Mail was direct, otherwise change at NBQ).

Various passenger trains to Ledo.

One passenger train to Lekhapani.

Today, we have through BG trains from Gujarat to Assam.

Batting averages in the third and fourth innings of Tests-September 2021

Hope you have seen these:

abn397.wordpress.com/2021/09/20/batting-averages-in-the-first-and-second-innings-of-tests-september-2021/

We now proceed to the third innings:

The cutoff here is 50.00

The first surprise here is that Bradman does not appear. Perhaps he did not bat enough in the third innings.

The leading batsman PBH May is a bit of a surprise. He is followed by JH Kallis and DCS Compton.

No current player appears in the top 10. The only players from recent times are K Sangakkara who retired in 2015 and HM Amla (2017). Batting in the third innings must have become more difficult in recent times.

From India there are M Amarnath and VVS Laxman.

Now for the fourth innings:

The cutoff here is 40.00.

Headed by Boycott, Gavaskar and Hobbs.

Current players here are KS Williamson (at 7), Kohli (at 8) besides recent player Younis Khan (at 9).

Other current players include AD Mathews (has he retired from Tests?), DA Warner, DM Bravo, Shakib Al Hasan, Asad Shafiq and R Taylor.

From India there are Gavaskar and Kohli in the top 10, followed by Dravid and Laxman.

It would seem that recent players have coped better with the fourth innings than with the third innings.

Another interesting topic to study would be the batters and bowlers who have done best in the fourth innings.

Batting averages in the first and second innings of Tests-September 2021

Hope you have seen this one:

In the first innings alone, we have:

The cutoff here is 55.

Bradman is still at #1, with over 100. Next are current player SPD Smith and another Australian in AL Hassett.

Ross Taylor, David Warner and F du Plessis are other current players here, though not in the top 10.

Among Indian players, Tendulkar is 9th here. Others are Sehwag, Dravid and Sidhu.

The Test record of 400* by Lara was in the first innings, besides the earlier records of 364 by Hutton and 334 by Bradman.

In the second innings, we have:

The cutoff here is still 55.

Bradman yet again leads, followed by current player KS Williamson and Mohammad Yousuf.

Other current players in the top ten are JE Root (4) and V Kohli (5).

Going further down, the other current players here are SPD Smith (besides AB de Villiers and AN Cook if you stretch a little).

From India, there is Kohli followed by Sehwag, Dravid, Gavaskar and Tendulkar.

The highest score here is 374 by M Jayawardene, while the old Test records of 365* by Sobers and 336* by Hammond are also here.

Current players seem to have done a little better here than in the first innings.

Will take up the third and fourth innings next. The results are somewhat different.

Batting averages across innings-September 2021

No Test matches for a while, so we can do some overall reviews.

Batting averages (Minimum 20 innings, 50.00):

Mr 99.94 is well known, but No 2 has already been forgotten. No 3 is fast closing in on No 2’s 61.87. The only other current player in the top 10 is No 6 with 60.80.

The highest for India is by VG Kambli (!) at 54.20. Something similar to the case of AC Voges.

From India, there are also Tendulkar, Dravid, Gavaskar and Kohli.

Among current players, there are SPD Smith, M Labuschagne, KS Williamson, V Kohli and JE Root (who just manages 50+).

In following posts we will look at batting averages across innings.

Delhi to Madras by metre gauge in 1976

While the near-complete removal of metre gauge from all important routes starting from the late 1970s, it would be a surprise to younger railfans that as late as 1976 it was possible to travel from Delhi Jn to Madras Egmore wholly by metre gauge. There was, of course, no such train but by a series of reasonably good MG expresses it was possible to make this journey of 2772 km. (In contrast, the standard GT express route would be 2182 km from Delhi Jn to Madras Central).

Let us begin our journey from Delhi Jn. I have taken the distances from the 1976 All India Time Table. Spelling of names are from that period. Inflated distances were being charged between Khandwa and Hingoli, so I have taken actual distances.

Km
0Delhi Jn
5Delhi Serai Rohilla
31Gurgaon
83RewariNR ends
185Nim-Ka-Thana
232Ringas
298Phulera
378Ajmer
402Nasirabad
567Chittaurgarh
620Nimach
753Ratlam
872Indore
893Mhow
1011KhandwaWR ends
1175Akola
1314Hingoli
1394PurnaCR ends
1535Nizamabad
1696Secunderabad
1704Kacheguda
1809Mahbubnagar
1940Kurnool Town
1993Dronachellam
2049GuntakalSCR ends
2117Anantapur
2151Dharmavaram
2296Madanapalle Road
2379Pakala
2409Chittoor
2452Katpadi
2462Vellore Cantt
2545Tiruvannamalai
2613Villupuram
2716Chengalpattu
2747Tambaram
2772Madras EgmoreSR

Perhaps someone can look at the timetables of that period and see the timings, and then arrive at a timetable for the proposed Delhi-Madras MG Express.

It would pass through DL, HR, RJ, MP, MH, AP and TN. (TG did not exist then).

From the timetables of that period, this trip should have been possible with changes at Ajmer, Secunderabad, Pakala and Villupuram. But there may have been long waiting times at these places.

Suggested trains: Delhi-Ahmedabad JJ Express, Ajmer-Kacheguda Passenger, SC-Tirupati Venkatadri Express up to Pakala, various passenger trains to Villupuram, various express trains to Madras Egmore.

The train with the longest run on this route was the Ajmer/Kacheguda Passenger with 1326 km.

Appendix: North to South on Metre Gauge.

At that time, Jammu Tawi was the northern-most station, but the northern-most MG station was Kot Kapura.

Similarly, Trivandrum Central was on BG since early 1976 and was the southern-most station. This was about 2 km south of Tiruchendur’s parallel of latitude. That was the southern-most MG station.

We now look at the “Northern Extension” from Rewari to Kot Kapura:

Km
0Rewari
83Bhiwani
143Hisar
225Sirsa
300Bhatinda
343Kot Kapura

And the “Southern Extension” from Villupuram to Tiruchendur:

Km
0Villupuram
55Vriddhachalam
109Ariyalur
178Tiruchchirapalli
271Dindigul
333Madurai
376Virudunagar
461Maniyachi
490Tirunelveli
552Tiruchendur

So our fictional North-South MG Express would run from Kot Kapura to Tiruchendur via Rewari and Villupuram. We can see from the above distance tables that it would come to be

2782-83+343-159+552 = 3435 Km

Coming soon: West to East by Metre Gauge in 1976 (Okha to Lekhapani)

1000 runs in Tests without a fifty

For a long time, Waqar Younis was the only who had crossed this barrier. Later. “GOAT” Lyon caught up, and now Kemar Roach:

There are as many as 54 Test players who have made 1000 runs without scoring a century. Some have managed a century practically at the end of their Test career (e.g. Kumble, Vaas).

Today there are three players with 2000 runs and no centuries:

Warne’s 3000+ looks safe here, unless Dickwella plays long enough without a century. He does hold the record of 18 fifties without a century, ahead of Chauhan with 16.

Summary of all England-India Tests-Sep 2021 (Pt 2)

Hope you have read Part 1.

Continuing with individual performances in Bowling:

Most wickets (40+):

Anderson has by far the most wickets. However, the most five-fors are by Chandrasekhar (8) followed by Ashwin and Botham with 6. Bedser is the only one with two ten-fors (which came in his first two Tests).

After Anderson and Ashwin, other current players include Broad, Ishant, Moeen and Jadeja.

Best innings bowling (including all case of 7wi or better):

The first few entries are from long ago, though Jadeja, Ishant and Broad are here. Ishant has the best figures for India in England (that too at Lord’s)

Best match bowling (including all cases of 10wm or better):

Interestingly, none of the two leading current Indian players (Ashwin and AR Patel) played in this series. Only Jadeja and Anderson represent the current players.

Best bowling averages (Minimum 2000 balls, maximum 35.00):

The best bowling averages are by Illingworth and Lever who played in relatively less matches. Anderson, Broad and Ashwin have the best averages among current players.

The best economy rates are by Illingworth and Nadkarni (who else?)

The best strike rates are by Lever and Willis.

Now for Fielding:

Most dismissals (30 or more):

Dhoni and Knott lead, although Kirmani has the most stumpings. Cook, Gavaskar and Dravid have the most catches by non-keepers.

Innings dismissals (5 or more):

Taylor and JT Murray lead, with current players Bairstow, Pant and Buttler bringing up the rear.

Yajurvindra has the most catches as a non-keeper, which came on his debut. He is still the only non-keeper to achieve this on debut.

Match dismissals (7 or more):

Led by RW Taylor, whose 10 was a Test record at that time.

There are Buttler (8). Bairstow, Pant and Rahul from among current players. Yajurvindra and Rahul have the best among non-keepers. Yajurvindra and Pant were making their debuts. Yajurvindra’s 7 catches are still the record by a fielder on debut.

Best dismissal rate (Minimum 20 innings, 0.75):

Pant tops this list, with Buttler, Bairstow and Rahul among current players here.

Solkar and Rahul have the best dismissal rates among non-keepers.

Finally, all-round performances:

Overall (see criteria from table):

Ashwin has by far the best record here, with MM Ali and Jadeja the next among current players.

Unexpected names here include Borde and Shami.

Match performances (50 and 5wi):

Many outstanding feats here, notably Botham’s century and 13 wickets in 1980. There are also century/5wis by Mankad and Ashwin, and fifty/10wms by Lever and Jadeja. JK Lever remains the only one to achieve this on debut.

Botham, B Kumar and Ashwin appear here twice.

However, there was no such instance from this series.