Important events on September 17

To begin with, Mallika Sherawat will sing:

Which was inspired by this:

 

Meanwhile, here are some other things which happened on September 17:

1908: The first ever fatal plane crash, though Orville Wright survived

1939: The USSR invades Poland, after Germany had occupied most of it

1940: Hitler decides to postpone the invasion of Britain

1948: The Nizam of Hyderabad decides to join the Indian Union

1954: “Lord of the Flies” is published

1978: The Camp David accords are signed

1983: Vanessa Williams becomes the first black Miss America

2011: The “Occupy Wall Street” movement starts

Some people born on September 17:

1859: Billy the Kid

1879: Periyar EV Ramaswamy

1915: MF Hussain

1930: Lalgudi Jayaraman

1950: Narendra Modi

1986: R Ashwin (cricketer)

 

 

 

The Ashes since 1970

So the 2019 series was drawn 2-2, and Australia retained the Ashes which they held since winning the 2017-18 series.

Here we look at the history of the Ashes since the 1970-71 series, when England won the Ashes after a long gap-Australia had held them since 1958-59 so they were away from England throughout the 1960s. There were also longish droughts for England in the early 1920s and from the mid-1930s to the mid-1950s.

Similarly, Australia had held the Ashes from 1989 to 2005, so the 1990s also passed without England getting hold of them. However, Australia has had the better of the contests since then (especially in Australia).

Ashes from 1970

A quick look at the list shows some captains who won the Ashes on two or more occasions, including Ian Chappell (2), Brearley (3), Border (3), Taylor (3), S Waugh (2), Strauss (2) and Cook (2).

Those who have lost the Ashes on two or more occasions are Border (3), Gooch (2), Atherton (2), Hussain (2), Ponting (3), Clarke (2) and Root (2).

1000 runs in Tests without a century

The 2019 Ashes ended in a 2-2 draw, like the 1972 edition. That was the last drawn Ashes series until now.

The “1000 and no century” club got its 52nd member in GOAT NM Lyon. He does not have a monopoly on this title as it was first used for Mohammed Ali (ex Cassius Clay) long ago.

1000 without century

Heading this list is Shane Warne, fittingly with a top score of 99 and over 3000 runs. Next is India’s opener (and later politician) CPS Chauhan with a top score of 97 and over 2000. No one else got up to 2000, though DL Murray got close.

Waqar Younis (top score 45) and now Lyon (top score 47) are the only ones who never crossed 50. As we can see above everyone else made at least one 50. Chauhan with 16 is followed by Dickwella and Mackay with 15.

The highest batting averages are 35+ by opener Laird, followed by Mackay (33+) and Chauhan (31+).

Warne, Starc, Surti, and DN Patel finished with a top score of 99.

At the other end of the scale are the 10/11 batsmen such as JM Anderson (9.68) who is the only one with a single-figure average. Waqar Younis and Muralitharan are next, with Zaheer Khan, Lyon, and Ambrose following.

Even Anderson did get up to 81 once. He, Ambrose and Muralitharan made precisely one fifty in their long careers.

Current players here include Dickwella, Southee, Philander, Starc and Steyn besides newcomer Lyon.

There were a few such as Kumble and Vaas who made one century towards the end of their careers. Otherwise they would be near the top of this list.

Bypasses of the Indian Railways

Many important stations of the Indian Railways have bypasses. These are used to reduce congestion, and especially where a reversal is eliminated.

While some are used mainly by goods trains, there is an increasing trend for more large junctions to be bypassed. In most cases a smaller station nearby is used as the “proxy” for long-distance trains to stop. Examples are Perambur for a few trains which skip MAS, Sevagram for Wardha Jn, Uslapur for Bilaspur, Pathankot Cantt (ex Chakki Bank) for Pathankot.

Here is a pdf file for all of the bypassed stations which I could think of. Additions and corrections are welcome.

Let us not consider “area bypasses” such as Vasai Road-Panvel or Gudur-Renigunta-Katpadi or Kharagpur-Asansol.

Bypasses on IR1

Perhaps we can think of a few more places where bypasses would be useful, such as Sawai Madhopur.

Trivia: the first custom-built bypass was probably the one at Shoranur which was commissioned in the early 1940s. Others which came up over the years due to realignments etc would be Allahabad-Chheoki and Podanur, (Yes, I know that the lines around Coimbatore have a complex history).

The best tailenders in Tests

Having studied the Indian tailenders here , we take a look at Test batsmen from 8 to    12 (!) in all Tests.

Minimum 20 innings, average 25.00

Tailenders (all)

Some of the players here also batted at 7 or higher. Jadeja’s only century and some of Kapil’s centuries came that way.

This list is headed by the relatively lesser known JDC Goddard who was the West Indies captain during the 1948-49 tour of India and the epochal 1950 tour of England.

The current players include (in descending order) Mahmudullah, Jadeja, JO Holder and Ashwin.

As most of us would be more familiar with recent players, we repeat the above exercise for players from 2000 onwards:

Minimum 20 innings, average 20.00 after 01 Jan 2000

Tailenders (all) since 2000

Here, only performances after 1 Jan 2000 are included. So the earlier careers of a few trans-millenials such as Boucher, Vettori, Pollock and Streak are not included here.

Here, Boucher is followed by the already forgotten MD Craig, Mahmudullah, Prior and Jadeja. Those currently playing include Mahmudullah, Jadeja, Holder and Ashwin.

Vettori has the most centuries (5) and 50+ scores (20). In contrast, Australia’s NM Hauritz has only one fifty but still manages a batting average of above 20. Similarly for SA’s AJ Hall and England’s TT Bresnan with two fifties apiece.

 

 

More on concentration camps

There is now talk of large-scale detention camps in various parts of India, like here:

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/asia/assam-india-detention-camps-bangladesh-nrc-list-a9099251.html

which is uncomfortably close to places like this:

Auschwitz

This sign was not only at Auschwitz, but at several similar camps.

And who invented the idea of concentration camps? Not Hitler and his pals.

This little video explains further (though you can always look up further references about the conduct of the Boer War).

India’s best tailenders

Ishant Sharma’s heroics and his maiden Test fifty reminded us of the importance of having tailenders who can score some runs. Or, failing that, at least stay around long enough for other batsmen to score some more runs. Ishant was perhaps more of the second type.

We have a quick look at the best performers at 8-11 in the three formats.

For Tests and ODIs  a cutoff of 20 innings is used. For T20Is it is 10 innings.

Test batting averages at 8-11:

Indian tailenders

RA Jadeja’s average is now above Kapil Dev’s. Remember that both of them and a few others like Nadkarni scored centuries up to No 7 as well.

Kapil, Ashwin and Harbhajan have two centuries here. Others with centuries are Kirmani, IK Pathan, Kumble and Agarkar.

Here Agarkar has the lowest average by a century-maker and Ishant the lowest by a fifty-maker.

The lowest average here is by Maninder Singh, followed by Chandrashekhar and Doshi which most would have guessed.

In ODIs, we have:

Indian Tailenders (ODI)

The highest averages are by Pathan and Chetan Sharma. Sharma has scored a century batting lower.

Pathan and Agarkar are the only ones here with 2 fifties. The lowest average by a fifty-scorer is by Praveen Kumar.

The lowest average is by Sreesanth, followed by Ishant Sharma and Nehra.

For T20Is, no one has 20 innings so we take the cutoff of 10 innings instead.

Indian tailenders - T20I

Ashwin and Harbhajan are the only ones who qualify here. Neither has scored a fifty.