T20Is of 2019-1

The year of the “big bang” when many new teams were admitted to “official” T20Is. A quick look at the results:

Teams ranked by W/L ratio:

T20Is 2019 WL

A total of 71 teams played at least one T20I this year.

You will agree that the above table doesn’t mean much. Australia (OK), Argentina and Belize !? are the top teams, are they? And is Jersey as good as India?

Let us look at the ICC rankings, which are supposed to be more refined:

ICC rankings T20I end 2019

There are 86 teams covered in these rankings. The last 7 have zero points:

T20Is 2019 bottom teams

One might argue that Gibraltar and China are the worst teams as they have played the most matches for zero points.

Anyway, back to the top. The T20I World Championship will be held in Australia in late 2020:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2020_ICC_Men%27s_T20_World_Cup

The 16 teams participating are the top 19 in the ICC ranking table MINUS Zimbabwe, Nepal and UAE.

Next we look at individual performances in T20Is.

Highest score at No 8 in World Cup

Nathan Coulter-Nile’s 92 against the West Indies was the highest score by any No 8 batsman in the World Cup.

Here are the list of all such scores above 40:

World Cup No 8

It can be seen that the record score at No 8 was earlier 72* by HH Streak in 2003.

The previous highest score by Australia was somewhat further down at 43 by BJ Haddin in 2015. Nearby there is 42 by CH Morris of SA in 2019.

The best by India is a mere 28 by NR Mongia in 1999.

Review of World Cup performances up to 2015: Fielding

We have looked at the World Cup records for batting and bowling. We now look at fielding.

Most dismissals (15 and above):

World Cup-total dismissals

Sangakkara and Gilchrist lead by a large margin. Sangakkara also has the most stumpings, and Gilchrist the most catches by a keeper.

Similarly Ponting leads non-keepers by a large margin.

Umar Akmal has the same number of catches as a keeper and non-keeper.

Most innings dismissals (4 and above):

World Cup-innings dismissals

Gilchrist and Sarfaraz Ahmed have the record with 6 catches in an innings.

No one has more than 2 stumpings.

Among non-keepers, the record is 4 by M Kaif, S Sarkar and Umar Akmal.

Kaif had the record to himself from 2003 until the other 2 joined him in 2015.

Finally, the dismissal rates.

Highest dismissal rates (Minimum 20 innings, 0.600 and above):

World Cup-Dismissal rate

Gilchrist leads the keepers and GC Smith the non-keepers.

 

ODI rankings before the 2019 World Cup

Note these rankings published on May 22, 2019.

The Tests had got over by May 2, the ODIs by May 21 and some T20Is are in progress among minor teams such as Namibia and Kenya.

We concentrate on the ODI rankings:

ICC ratings May 22 2019

We see that the top 10 teams are indeed the same teams playing in the World Cup.

This ranking seems to show that England and India are close together, followed by the pair of South Africa and New Zealand. Next is Australia and there is a steep fall to Pakistan and the others. This seems to conform to general opinion. As Australia had been without two of their key players for a year, they now have the capacity to get a semi-final place at the expense of South Africa or New Zealand.

You can also see the T20I rankings of the major teams.

 

 

A mockery of cricket (2)

As earlier mentioned, all T20 matches between ICC members now have T20I status. This has led to highly one-sided results, though there have also been surprises such as the Thai women’s team winning against Sri Lanka.

We now come to the case of non-local players in a national team. Some teams such as the UAE have been doing this for years, But one should remember that more than 50% of UAE’s population are expatriates, many of whom are from cricket majors such as India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

Oman and Hong Kong have followed a similar policy, as have other potential “major market” teams such as the USA and Canada. Some African teams such as Kenya have  Asian players whose families have lived there for generations, similar to the Kallicharans and Chanderpauls of the West Indies.

China, to its credit, has stuck to indigenous players in spite of suffering heavy losses.

Countries of the British Isles have (in recent years) been dependent on “imports” from various sources such as Australia, South Africa, New Zealand, the West Indies and South Asia. Admittedly, many of those from the “white Commonwealth” (such as Trott, Strauss, Pietersen, Stokes and Caddick) are those whose families had migrated FROM Britain one or two generations ago.

And there are weird cases such as Andrew Symonds (born in Britain to West Indian parents, grew up in Britain, played for Australia). Another is Dimitri Mascarenhas (born in Britain to Sri Lankan parents, grew up in Australia and finally played for England).

And there are those of Asian origin such as current players Moeen Ali and Adil Rashid and others from the recent past such as Ravi Bopara and Monty Panesar who have lived in Britain all their lives.

Dependence on foreign players (even if they are from former colonies) seems to be important in some major soccer teams, a good example being France. But there have been critics of this from within France, particularly when they won the World Cup in 1998 (when Zidane scored the first two goals in the final). Politicians such as Le Pen had nasty things to say then.

Now we come to the western European countries. Apart from the Netherlands, there is little tradition of cricket and most teams have to depend on imports (especially from South Asia, predominantly from Pakistan and now Afghanistan).

To prove this point, we look at the recent 3-match T20I series between Belgium and Germany. Belgium met its Waterloo, losing 3-0 in the matches played at (where else?) Waterloo.

You can see details of this series here:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/scores/series/19254/germany-in-belgium-t20is-2019

Let us take the scorecard of any of the matches, say the second one:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/19254/scorecard/1183921/belgium-vs-germany-2nd-t20i-germany-tour-of-belgium-2019

We can see that the German team has 10 of the 11 members clearly from South Asia, certainly from India and Pakistan and perhaps Sri Lanka and Afghanistan. There is one with an Anglo-Saxon name called Daniel Weston who was born and brought up in Australia (Perth) but NOT Germany. Presumably all are citizens or permanent residents of Germany, but what is it doing to popularize cricket among the average sports followers in Germany? Not much.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Weston

Now look at the Belgian team.

All 11 in the team appear to be of Pakistani or Afghan origin. (Possibly some are from India, but I doubt it). And both Germany and Belgium do NOT have a tradition of immigration from South Asia as Britain has.

What good is this doing to develop European cricket if the match between Germany and Belgium includes 21 South Asians and one Aussie? Particularly when practically all of these players would be unlikely to make any decent team in their own country?

And the German and Belgian sports fans would stick to watching their soccer, hockey or tennis players rather than cricket.

Tail piece: In the 3rd T20I Weston did not play so  the match could well be described as German South Asians vs Belgian South Asians.

ODIs of 2018-1

The ODIs of the year are over, and we review team and individual performances here:

First, the ICC rankings at the end of the year:

Team ranking

It can be seen that the 10 teams participating in the 2019 World Cup are the top 10 here.

This table includes matches in the past 2-3 years. Nepal has ODI status but has not played enough matches to get a ranking.

Here we look at W/L ratios. This and all subsequent tables refer to performances in the calendar year 2018.

Teams ranked by W/L ratio

Team perf

Guess who finished last 🙂

And guess who played the most matches.

Of course, this table does not mean much as it does not take into account the opponent’s strength, which the ICC rankings are supposed to.

We now move to individual performances, starting with

Batting:

500 or more runs:

Batting-500

Also note that Kohli (6) and RG Sharma (5) have the most centuries, while Kohli (9) also has the most fifties followed by RG Sharma, Root and Fakhar Zaman with 8.

Innings scores of 125 or more:

Batting Innings-125

Batting averages (Minimum 20 innings, all instances):

Batting average

You might expect Kohli, Sharma and a few others to be here but they did not play enough innings. However, they appear below:

Highest strike rates (Minimum 80.00 for a minimum of 500 balls faced):

Batting strike rate

Note that England has the two top spots, while India also has a few with strike rates above 100.

To be continued.

ABD: career statistics highlights-2

We have already had a look at ABD’s Test figures. He did not do too well in T20Is. But he really came into his own in fast scoring in ODIs. His highest score there was 176. First we look at his career strike rate.

(In all the tables in this post, matches involving multi-national teams such as ICC XI, Africa XI and Asia XI have been disregarded.)

ODI career strike rate (minimum 20 innings):

Career ODI strike rates

Here ABD is relatively lower down, as many batsmen with less matches have scored faster. But his batting average of 54.17 is much higher than that of the likes of Maxwell and Russell.

A better comparison will be with those with longer careers:

ODI career strike rate (minimum 200 innings):

Career ODI strike rates-200 innings

Here he is third, after Afridi and Sehwag. Here, too, his career batting average of 54.17 is considerably higher than that of those with higher strike rates. Kohli with a batting average of 58.10 has a somewhat lower strike rate.

We now go on to innings strike rates in ODIs. While ABD’s top score was 176, we start with the 200+ scores as a comparison.

Strike rates for scores above 200 in ODIs:

Strike rates for 200+ in ODI

There have been only 7 instances of ODI double centuries so far, with 5 by Indian batsmen including 3 by RG Sharma. Gayle and Guptill made their scores in the 2015 World Cup. Sharma and Sehwag have the highest strike rates here.

Next we look at

Strike rates for scores above 150 in ODIs:

150+

Here ABD has by far the highest strike rate in his 162*, which against the West Indies in the 2015 World Cup.

Next we have

Strike rates for scores above 100 in ODIs:

100+

Here, ABD is the clear leader with his 149 against the West Indies, in the runup to the 2015 World Cup. His 162* mentioned above is also here, as are a few other centuries.

Next there is

Strike rates for scores above 50 in ODIs:

50+

ABD still leads with the 149 mentioned above. For scores between 50 and 99, the best strike rates are by the NZ pair of Guptill and McCullum.

But it is an unique distinction that ABD has the best strike rates for 50+, 100+ and 150+ in ODIs.

Finally, we look at

Strike rates for scores above 25 in ODIs:

25+

Here, the top two positions are held by two New Zealand players (including BB McCullum’s lesser known brother) with scores in the 30s. But ABD is still there at the third spot.

A little more wrapping up of high strike rates in ODIs will be done in another post.

 

 

 

 

 

Previous encounters between Ireland and Pakistan

As the first Test between Ireland and Pakistan gets under way, we look at how they have fared in the shorter formats.

ODIs between Ireland and Pakistan:

Ire v Pak ODIs

There have been other 50-over matches between these teams before Ireland got ODI status, but those details are not readily available. Those matches were generally part of Pakistan’s Test tours of England.

We see that 7 ODIs between these teams have been completed. Pakistan lead 5-1 with 1 tie. However it is their first encounter which is remembered, when Ireland’s “beginner’s luck” at the 2007 World Cup played a large part in Pakistan’s early departure. (Similarly Bangladesh spoiled India’s party in the same World Cup).

The scorecard of that first match: http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/8039/scorecard/247465/ireland-vs-pakistan-9th-match,-group-d-world-cup-2006-07/

A few members of Ireland’s team on that occasion will be playing in the inaugural Test starting on May 11.

Only one T20I has been played between these teams, which was at the 2009 T20 World Championships. Ireland had got into the Super 8s essentially by defeating Bangladesh. Pakistan won by a large margin. Pakistan went on to win the championship, while defending champion India did not reach the semi-finals.

Again, a few members of that Irish team are playing in today’s Test.

Ire v Pak T20Is

Scorecard of that match:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/8604/scorecard/356012/ireland-vs-pakistan-21st-match,-group-f-world-t20-2009/

Quick statistical summary of the 2017 Champions Trophy

Here we focus on individual performances rather than the end result.

Most runs (100 and above):

CT 2017-100 plus runs

No one scored more than one century. Several made 3 scores of 50-plus.

Dhawan, RG Sharma and Tamim scored the most runs.

Though there is not much sense in calculating averages and strike rates with a lesser number of matches, we can see that Kohli averaged 129.00. Next is Stokes with 92.00

The highest strike rate here is by HH Pandya with 194.44, with Fakhar Zaman, Dhawan and Morgan just crossing 100.

Highest individual scores (75 and above):

CT 2017-innings of 75 runs plus

Consistent performances by RG Sharma, Dhawan and Kohli except in the final. Other consistent performances by Tamim, Fakhar Zaman and Williamson among others.

Bowling-5 or more wickets:

CT 2017-5 plus wickets

Hasan Ali clearly leads, while Hazlewood took most of his wickets in one innings. In this limited sample, Hasan Ali has the best average and best economy while Hazlewood has the best strike rate.Plunkett is the only one with two 4-wicket hauls.

Best innings bowling-3wi and above:

CT 2017-3wi and above

Note that startling consistency of Hasan Ali who took exactly 3 wickets in an innings in 4 matches.

Best fielding (3 or more dismissals):

CT 2017-dismissals

Sarfraz has the most dismissals and catches, Buttler the most stumpings, while Babar Azam, Jadeja and Maxwell have the most catches by non-keepers.

Best innings fielding (2 or more):

CT 2017-innings fielding

Sarfraz and non-keeper Maxwell have the most dismissals.

All-round performance (see criteria below):

CT 2017-AR overall

No one has reached these modest requirements.

All-round match performance (Minimum 20 runs and 2 wickets):

CT 2017-AR match

Nothing outstanding, although M. Amir’s performance may have been the most valuable.

 

The jinx in India-Pakistan matches

Note: This was written before the start of the 2017 Champions Trophy.

It is often said that India dominates Pakistan in ICC tournaments. Hence the “Mauka Mauka” ads which aired at the beginning of the 2015 World Cup.

Let us see take a closer look at the history of these encounters. First, the World Cup:

I v P World Cup

India and Pakistan never met in the World Cups of 1975, 1979, 1983 and 1987. They were somehow always drawn in different groups so they could have met only in the semi-finals or finals. It was not until 1992 that they met in the World Cup. In that tournament all teams played each other in the knockout stage.

They met in the quarter-finals in 1996, Super Six in 1999, and a pool match in 2003. India won all these matches so the feeling of a jinx over Pakistan kept growing.

In 2007, both India and Pakistan were jinxed and failed to proceed beyond the pool stage, being displaced by Bangladesh and Ireland respectively.

In 2011, India won in the semi-final and repeated this in a pool match in 2015. So India have won all 6 encounters.

If you want to see the scorecards, open this link and click on the blue square on the extreme right.

http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/stats/index.html?class=2;filter=advanced;opposition=7;orderby=start;team=6;template=results;trophy=12;type=team;view=results

Now we go to the T20 World Championship. We will come back to the Champions Trophy at the end.

I v P T20

The teams met twice in the inaugural championship in 2007. Though the match in the pool stage was a tie, India got the winner’s points as they won in the bowl-out which was then the method used to determine the winner of a tied match.

Then India won against Pakistan in the final. The teams did not meet in 2009 and 2010. India won the next three encounters in 2012, 2014 and 2016. All of these were in the group stages and not the semi-final or final. Thus India leads 5-0 (including the tie) in the World T20 Championship.

You can see the scorecards from this link:

http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/stats/index.html?class=3;filter=advanced;opposition=7;orderby=start;team=6;template=results;trophy=89;type=team;view=results

For details of the bowl-out in the first match in 2007, see the commentary section rather than the scorecard.

But the story in the Champions Trophy is somewhat different:

I v P Chamions

India and Pakistan did not meet in 1998, 2000 or 2002 (when India shared the trophy with Sri Lanka). Pakistan won the first encounter in 2004 in the group stage. They did not meet in 2006. Pakistan won in 2009, also in the group stage. India finally won in 2013, in a group match on their way to the trophy.

So the jinx on Pakistan in ICC tournaments does not apply to Pakistan in the Champions Trophy, where they lead India 2-1. Let us see what happens when they meet on June 4. India currently has a higher ranking than Pakistan, but that has no bearing in high-tension encounters like these.

See the scorecards here:

http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/stats/index.html?class=2;filter=advanced;opposition=7;orderby=start;team=6;template=results;trophy=44;type=team;view=results