The jinx in India-Pakistan matches

Note: This was written before the start of the 2017 Champions Trophy.

It is often said that India dominates Pakistan in ICC tournaments. Hence the “Mauka Mauka” ads which aired at the beginning of the 2015 World Cup.

Let us see take a closer look at the history of these encounters. First, the World Cup:

I v P World Cup

India and Pakistan never met in the World Cups of 1975, 1979, 1983 and 1987. They were somehow always drawn in different groups so they could have met only in the semi-finals or finals. It was not until 1992 that they met in the World Cup. In that tournament all teams played each other in the knockout stage.

They met in the quarter-finals in 1996, Super Six in 1999, and a pool match in 2003. India won all these matches so the feeling of a jinx over Pakistan kept growing.

In 2007, both India and Pakistan were jinxed and failed to proceed beyond the pool stage, being displaced by Bangladesh and Ireland respectively.

In 2011, India won in the semi-final and repeated this in a pool match in 2015. So India have won all 6 encounters.

If you want to see the scorecards, open this link and click on the blue square on the extreme right.

http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/stats/index.html?class=2;filter=advanced;opposition=7;orderby=start;team=6;template=results;trophy=12;type=team;view=results

Now we go to the T20 World Championship. We will come back to the Champions Trophy at the end.

I v P T20

The teams met twice in the inaugural championship in 2007. Though the match in the pool stage was a tie, India got the winner’s points as they won in the bowl-out which was then the method used to determine the winner of a tied match.

Then India won against Pakistan in the final. The teams did not meet in 2009 and 2010. India won the next three encounters in 2012, 2014 and 2016. All of these were in the group stages and not the semi-final or final. Thus India leads 5-0 (including the tie) in the World T20 Championship.

You can see the scorecards from this link:

http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/stats/index.html?class=3;filter=advanced;opposition=7;orderby=start;team=6;template=results;trophy=89;type=team;view=results

For details of the bowl-out in the first match in 2007, see the commentary section rather than the scorecard.

But the story in the Champions Trophy is somewhat different:

I v P Chamions

India and Pakistan did not meet in 1998, 2000 or 2002 (when India shared the trophy with Sri Lanka). Pakistan won the first encounter in 2004 in the group stage. They did not meet in 2006. Pakistan won in 2009, also in the group stage. India finally won in 2013, in a group match on their way to the trophy.

So the jinx on Pakistan in ICC tournaments does not apply to Pakistan in the Champions Trophy, where they lead India 2-1. Let us see what happens when they meet on June 4. India currently has a higher ranking than Pakistan, but that has no bearing in high-tension encounters like these.

See the scorecards here:

http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/stats/index.html?class=2;filter=advanced;opposition=7;orderby=start;team=6;template=results;trophy=44;type=team;view=results

 

 

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Statistics of the Champions Trophy-1

For a quick overview of past tournaments see the previous post:

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2017/05/25/history-of-the-champions-trophy-since-1998/

Here are the statistics for all CT matches from 1998 to 2013. In case there is any doubt, it also includes the qualifying matches for the teams seeded 7th to 10th in 2006 which were played just before the “main” tournament for the top 8 teams.

Batting-most runs-250 and above:

Most runs-above 250

Chris Gayle leads M Jayawardene and Sangakkara. The two Sri Lankans have played the most CT matches (22).

Gayle, Ganguly and Gibbs (the three Gs?) have the most centuries (3).

For scores of 50+, Dravid leads with 6 while several others have 5.

Highest innings scores (all scores of 100 and above):

Highest scores-all centuries

Astle and Andy Flower lead, with Astle making his score against the US on its one Championship in 2004. As we will see later, Tendulkar’s 141* featured in one of the best all-round performances in the championship.

Batting averages (minimum 15 innings batted):

Highest averages-10 innings

Chanderpaul is just above Gayle here.

It can be seen that the highest strike rates are 88.77 by Gayle and 88.01 by Jayasuriya.

Bowling (15 or more wickets):

Most wickets-above 15

Headed by the relatively unheralded Kyle Mills followed by Muralitharan.

Best innings bowling (including all 5wi):

Innings bowling-all 5wi

Note that the only 6-wicket haul came from one of the qualifying matches in 2006.

Best bowling averages (minimum 750 balls bowled):

Bowling average-750 balls

Muralitharan has the best bowling average, economy rate and strike rate.

To be continued: