More about the honors boards at Lord’s-1

The feats of scoring a century, five wickets in an innings and ten wickets in a match in Test matches are documented on the boards at Lord’s. There are separate sets of boards for the home team (England), visiting teams and (more recently) teams in neutral Tests.

A total of 135 Tests have been played at Lord’s from 1884 to 2017. 133 involved England and only 2 were neutral. They were: Aus v SA in 1912 as part of the Triangular Tournament, and Aus v Pak in 2010.

3 Tests (including one neutral Test) were played in 1912 and 2010. From 1928 onwards (except in 1940-45) Lord’s has always had at least one Test. When England started hosting two visiting teams in 1965 (starting with NZ and SA) Lord’s always had a Test for each side. Since 2000 there have always been two teams and thus two Tests at Lord’s, except in 2010 when there were three.

Neutral Tests at Lord’s:

Neutral at Lord's

We first look at the scanty entries on the boards for neutral Tests:

Centuries:

Neutral at Lord's-Batting

Two from 1912 and none from 2010.

Five wickets in an innings:

Neutral at Lord's-Bowling

In contrast, there are two from 2010 and none from 1912. Watson and North recorded their first five-fors. In North’s case, he was an occasional bowler and this was his only five-for in Tests.

Ten wickets in an innings:

No instance. The two best match bowling figures are 6-55 by MJ North (as above) and 6-140 by Pakistan’s Mohammed Asif in the same match.

To be continued:

 

 

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Review of Australia-South Africa Tests-1

South Africa won the recent series 2-1, thus completing a hat-trick of successive Test series victories in Australia. They had earlier won 2-1 in 2008-09 an 1-0 in 2012-13. However, Australia was doing better in South Africa, winning 2-1 in 2008-09, drawing 1-1 in 2011-12 and winning 2-1 in 2013-14.

It may or may not be significant that Australia won the last Test which was a pink-ball Test, the second to be played in Australia.

Here we see the summary of all Tests between these teams:

aus-sa-summary

Australia still has a healthy lead across all venues. The long-forgotten neutral Tests were part of the Tri-Series in 1912, the only Test series of its kind. It was given up as a bad idea (appropriate as it was the year of the “Titanic”).

However these were the first neutral Tests ever played. Kelleway and Bardsley scored centuries at Lord’s, and their names finally went up on the “neutral” batting board there in 2010 when another Test between Australia and Pakistan was played there. Marcus North and Shane Watson got on the bowling board then. It was the only Test where Shahid Afridi led Pakistan, and was followed by the short and ill-starred reign of Salman Butt.

Coming back to the usual numbers:

Batting:

Most runs (800 and above):

aus-sa-runs

Amla and Warner are the only current players here. Note Bradman’s meteoric series, in which he became the only Test player to be left on 299 not out. No one has scored 199* in a Test, though there have been a few 99*s.

Harvey and Ponting scored 8 centuries each, followed by Hayden with 6.

The most scores of 50+ were made by Ponting (19), Kallis (15), de Villiers (14) and Harvey (13)

Highest innings (175 and above):

aus-sa-hs

Nothing from this low-scoring series, though there are some from 2012.

Batting averages (Minimum 20 innings, average 30 and above):

aus-sa-bat-avg

Amla and Duminy represent the current players. Harvey has an average much higher than that of Graeme Pollock, the next in line.

Now for bowling:

Most wickets (30 and above):

aus-sa-wkts

Warne has by far the highest tally. Steyn, Siddle and Lyon represent the current players.

Best innings bowling:

aus-sa-innings-bowling

Nothing from the current players. Note the havoc which Grimmett used to cause.

Best match bowling:

aus-sa-match-bowling

Again, nothing from the current players though there is one by the recently-retired MG Johnson in 2014. Grimmett dominates here as well.

Bowling averages (Minimum 2000 balls, all instances):

aus-sa-bowling-avg

Grimmett and other old-timers occupy the top 3 places followed by Warne. Steyn, Siddle and Lyon are also there.

It can be seen that the best economy rate is by Goddard (1.72) and the best strike rate is by Whitty (41.1) followed by Steyn with 46.2

To be continued

Those who missed the bus at Lord’s (Revised in Sep 2017)

The honours board at Lord’s are well known-anyone who scores a century or takes a fiver or a tenner gets his name on them, even if it is a neutral Test not involving England. If you need to brush up, see

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord%27s_honours_boards

and for Indian players featured there, full details are here:

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2016/07/24/indian-cricketers-on-the-lords-honours-boards/

Also, the full list of names on the various boards have been covered in the last few posts on this blog.

However, note this extract from the Wikipedia article:

“A number of very distinguished players such as Sachin Tendulkar, Ricky Ponting, Shane Warne, Curtly Ambrose and Brian Lara are not named on the honours boards.”

It may be recalled that there was much heartbreak when Sachin failed to score a century in 2011, which was generally understood then to be his last Test there.

We now look at the aspect of prominent players failing to reach a board-worthy performance at Lord’s despite several opporunities. There are some visitors who simply did not get to play enough at Lord’s.

 

Indian cricketers on the Lord’s honours boards

Hope you have read the earlier post:

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2016/07/20/all-round-feats-at-lords/

Here we continue our focus on Lord’s with the list of Indian batsmen and bowlers who figure on the honours boards there.

First, batting:

Lord's-India batting-1

Some points of interest:

Mankad’s century came along with a five-for. He and Ian Botham are the only ones to score a century and take a five-for in the same match at Lord’s.

Dilip Vengsarkar is the ONLY visiting batsman from any country to score 3 Test centuries at this venue.

Ganguly’s 131 came on his Test debut. It is the highest innings score by anyone making his Test debut at this venue.

Agarkar made his only Test century here-all the more remarkable as his next highest score was 41. Now you know the answer to the old quiz question “What batting feat was attained by Agarkar and not by Gavaskar and Tendulkar?”

So we see the Indian batsmen on the honours board listed above. Let us stretch a bit and include those who scored 100 or more in a match without making a century:

Lord's-India batting-2

The most runs here is by Kapil in 1982. He also took 5 wickets in the match.

Gavaskar did make 100 runs in a match here, but Tendulkar did not.

Now we come to the bowling boards, listing all Indians who have taken  5 wickets in an innings here:

Lord's-India bowling-1

A fair cross-section of Indian bowlers over the years. Ishant Sharma now holds the record with 7-74, surpassing the record of 6-35 by Amar Singh in 1936. Mohammed Nissar’s fiver came on his Test debut which was also India’s first Test.

Match bowling figures for the above matches are given here:

Lord's-India bowling-2

From this, we can see that the best match figures by an Indian bowler are 8-168 by Kapil in 1982-when he also scored over a hundred runs including an 89.This would be the second-best all-round performance by an Indian at Lord’s, surpassed only by Mankad’s epic in 1952.

Next to Kapil’s 8-wicket haul there are 7-wicket hauls by Prasad, RP Singh and Ishant Sharma.

We now look at cases where players took 5 wickets in a match, without taking a five-for in an innings. Here the match figures are given:

Lord's-India bowling-3

Kapil’s effort came in India’s first victory at this venue.

Also look back to the match starting on 22 Jul 1971, where three spinners accounted for 17 wickets. This came close to being India’s first victory at Lord’s (and in England).

There is also an honours board for 10-wicket hauls, in which no Indian appears. There are some performances by English bowlers against India, notably Alec Bedser’s 11-wicket haul on his debut in 1946.

All-round feats at Lord’s

You would have heard of the honours boards at Lord’s. A summary can be seen here.

The “neutral” boards are dealt with at more length here  towards the end of the post.

Basically these boards list all instances of i) centuries ii) five wickets in an innings and iii) ten wickets in a match at this ground. Here we look at instances of all-round performances.

Only two have scored a century and taken a five-for in the same Tests. They are among the all-time greats:

Lord's match allround

Then there are others who have scored centuries and taken five-fors at Lord’s, but not necessarily in the same Test. The full list (which includes the pair listed above) is:

Lords allround-2

If you remove Mankad and Botham, you still have Allen, Miller, Illingworth, Flintoff and Broad who have scored centuries as well as five-fors at Lord’s. None have scored more than one century at this venue, though there are some instances of multiple five-fors.

There have been only three instances of centuries and ten-fors in the same Test, and all of them have occurred in Asia. We can find a few who have achieved centuries and ten-fors at Lord’s, but not in the same Test:

Lord's allround-3

Incidentally Allen and Broad scored their only Test centuries at Lord’s.

Let us now look at all-round performances at Lord’s which go beyond the honours boards.

A fifty and ten wickets in the match:

Lord's allround-4

Only one instance. If we “stretch” this to 50 or more runs and ten or more wickets, we get:

Lord's allround-5

Miller and newcomer Woakes are added here.

And finally, 100 or more runs and five or more wickets in the match:

Lord's allround-6

Additions to the original pair of Mankad and Botham (1978) are Morkel, Kapil, Botham (1984) and Mark Butcher. The earlier Morkel does not seem to be related to Albie and Morne. The instance of Botham in 1984 was the time when West Indies made 344/1 to win the match. And Butcher was an occasional bowler who took only 15 wickets in his Test career.

 

 

 

Shane Watson’s Test career

Although Shane Watson‘s Test career was not extraordinary, he fulfilled the role of a batting all-rounder for some years. His contribution to limited overs cricket was more striking, as he holds the record for Australia’s top score in ODIs (185*) and second highest in T20Is (124*).

Leaving out the Test against the ICC XI, he played 58 Tests, scoring 3697 runs and taking 75 wickets. If we compare his all-round performance in those of other Australians who had a minimum of 1000 runs and 50 wickets, it is above average but not outstanding (9th out of 22). The only other Australian of that time who might be called an all-rounder was Mitchell Johnson, who was a considerably better bowler but certainly a worse batsman.

Watson1

However, Watson does have one claim to fame in that he is one of only 4 players to feature on the “neutral” honours board at Lord’s. More about the honours boards here:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lord’s_honours_boards

Only two neutral Tests have been played here. One was between Australia and South Africa as part of the experimental triangular Test series of 2012:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/62391.html

Australia easily defeated South Africa by 10 wickets. In general it was felt that the triangular Test series was a bad idea and it was not repeated. The nearest revival it got was the interlocking tours of England and West Indies to Australia in 1979-80.

Then there was the Test between Australia and Pakistan in 2010:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/426394.html

The neutral honours boards thus have these entries:

Batting:

watson2

Bowling:

Watson3

(There is also a board for ten wickets in a match, which does not have any entries yet).

The actual board being “unveiled” with the new entries:

Watson4

This Test marked the Test debuts of Steve Smith (1, 12 and 3-51) and Azhar Ali (16 and 42). Watson got the first of his three fivers  while North got his only one here. This match marked Shahid Afridi’s only Test as captain; after this he retired from Tests altogether.

In the second neutral Test at Leeds, Salman Butt’s ill-fated captaincy began with a 3-wicket victory over Australia.

http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/426395.html

Watson recorded his career-best 6-33 in this Test, while the two As (Asif and Amir) combined to bowl Australia out for 88.