The Worst Defeats in T20Is-2

The Malian women’s T20I team has been making headlines all over the cricket world (not only in Bamako and famed Timbuktu) for their abject defeats.

Earlier we have looked at the worst defeats of men’s T20I teams.

The worst defeat in a limited overs match is measured by either 1) runs or 2) balls remaining when the target is reached.

One can also look at 3) lowest scores by runs 4) highest scores by runs conceded

And as a stretch: 5) least balls in an innings.

We now look at the records of women’s T20Is as on 28-06-2019:

Losses by runs (100 and above):

WT20I defeats-runs

We see that the top three defeats were sustained by Mali, with China and Lesotho a little behind. We will see much more of Mali in the remaining part of this post.

Even some “respectable” teams such as South Africa, WI and Sri Lanka can be found here.

Losses by balls remaining (72 or more):

WT20I defeats-balls

These are all the cases where a target was chased down in 8 overs or less. In two cases only 4 balls were enough.

As you may guess, the Mali team holds the top three positions. Mozambique and Fiji are next in line. The only “respectable” team here is Ireland.

Lowest scores (30 or less):

WT20I defeats-lowest scores

The three lowest scores are by Mali in the span of three days in June 2019. Note that they did improve to 30/9 in 20 overs. China is also here with its record of 14 set earlier in 2019. Even Bangladesh has a score of 30.

Least balls in an innings (72 or less):

WT201 defeats-least balls batted.

Mali again, though they took less balls to score 14 than their 6. Mexico, China and Kuwait give them company.

And finally

Highest opposing totals (190 and above):

WT20I defeats-highest totals conceded

Note that almost all of these are in the first innings.

Mali yet again in 1st, 2nd and 4th place although South Africa is in 3rd and 5th place. Many other “respectable” teams have been at the receiving end, including India against England in 2018.

You can guess why those who follow statistics may be planning to visit Timbuktu. While this is supposes to be in an area affected by terrorism, you can at least get to Mali’s capital Bamako with a single stop at Paris or Addis Ababa. With luck, you can reach there within 18 hours from Delhi.

The Worst Defeats in T20Is-1

The Malian women’s T20I team has been making headlines all over the cricket world (not only in Bamako and famed Timbuktu) for their abject defeats.

It is a good time to examine the worst T20I defeats. For a change, gentlemen before ladies.

The worst defeat in a limited overs match is measured by either 1) runs or 2) balls remaining when the target is reached.

One can also look at 3) lowest scores by runs 4) highest scores by runs conceded

And as a stretch: 5) least balls in an innings.

We now look at the records of men’s T20Is as on 27-06-2019:

Losses by runs (100 and above):

T20I defeats-runs

We can see that the worst defeat was sustained by Kenya in the 2007 World Championship, and that they made 88 when facing a Sri Lankan total of 260.

Losses by balls remaining (60 or more):

T20I defeats-balls remain

These are all the cases where a target was chased down in 10 overs or less.

The “winner” here was Botswana who were dismissed for 46, and then let Namibia hit off these runs in 3.5 overs or 16.1 overs/97 balls remaining. Next comes Netherlands in the course of the 2014 World Championship. Other whipping boys such as Kenya, Nepal and Germany follow.

Lowest scores (60 or less):

T20I defeats-lowest totals by runs

The biggest fail here is Netherlands with 39 against Sri Lanka in the 2014 World Championship (mentioned above).

And next is one of the big boys, West Indies with 45 against England earlier this year.

Other whipping boys such as Botswana, Germany and Nepal follow.

Least balls in an innings (90 or less):

T20I defeats-lowest totals by balls

The lowest tally here is 10.3 overs, just over the halfway mark.

Most of these are in the second innings.

Our old friends Netherlands again, followed by West Indies as mentioned above.

A few teams such as South Africa have crossed 100 here in less than 15 overs.

And finally,

Highest opposing totals (240 and above):

T20I defeats-most runs conceded

Note that almost all of these are in the first innings.

Ireland has conceded the most (278) to Afghanistan earlier this year. But even Australia had a similar experience against Sri Lanka in 2016. Kenya conceded 260 to Sri Lanka in 2007 as mentioned earlier.

Next we will take up women’s T20Is, which includes single-digit totals.

 

 

 

A mockery of cricket (2)

As earlier mentioned, all T20 matches between ICC members now have T20I status. This has led to highly one-sided results, though there have also been surprises such as the Thai women’s team winning against Sri Lanka.

We now come to the case of non-local players in a national team. Some teams such as the UAE have been doing this for years, But one should remember that more than 50% of UAE’s population are expatriates, many of whom are from cricket majors such as India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka.

Oman and Hong Kong have followed a similar policy, as have other potential “major market” teams such as the USA and Canada. Some African teams such as Kenya have  Asian players whose families have lived there for generations, similar to the Kallicharans and Chanderpauls of the West Indies.

China, to its credit, has stuck to indigenous players in spite of suffering heavy losses.

Countries of the British Isles have (in recent years) been dependent on “imports” from various sources such as Australia, South Africa, the West Indies and South Asia. Admittedly, many of those from the “white Commonwealth” (such as Trott, Strauss, Pietersen and Caddick) are those whose families had migrated FROM Britain one or two generations ago.

And there are weird cases such as Andrew Symonds (born in Britain to West Indian parents, grew up in Britain, played for Australia). Another is Dimitri Mascarenhas (born in Britain to Sri Lankan parents, grew up in Australia and finally played for England).

And there are those of Asian origin such as current players Moeen Ali and Adil Rashid and others from the recent past such as Ravi Bopara and Monty Panesar who have lived in Britain all their lives.

Dependence on foreign players (even if they are from former colonies) seems to be important in some major soccer teams, a good example being France. But there have been critics of this from within France, particularly when they won the World Cup in 1998 (when Zidane scored the first two goals in the final). Politicians such as Le Pen had nasty things to say then.

Now we come to the western European countries. Apart from the Netherlands, there is little tradition of cricket and most teams have to depend on imports (especially from South Asia, predominantly from Pakistan and now Afghanistan).

To prove this point, we look at the recent 3-match T20I series between Belgium and Germany. Belgium met its Waterloo, losing 3-0 in the matches played at (where else?) Waterloo.

You can see details of this series here:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/scores/series/19254/germany-in-belgium-t20is-2019

Let us take the scorecard of any of the matches, say the second one:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/19254/scorecard/1183921/belgium-vs-germany-2nd-t20i-germany-tour-of-belgium-2019

We can see that the German team has 10 of the 11 members clearly from South Asia, certainly from India and Pakistan and perhaps Sri Lanka and Afghanistan. There is one with an Anglo-Saxon name called Daniel Weston who was born and brought up in Australia (Perth) but NOT Germany. Presumably all are citizens or permanent residents of Germany, but what is it doing to popularize cricket among the average sports followers in Germany? Not much.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_Weston

Now look at the Belgian team.

All 11 in the team appear to be of Pakistani or Afghan origin. (Possibly some are from India, but I doubt it). And both Germany and Belgium do NOT have a tradition of immigration from South Asia as Britain has.

What good is this doing to develop European cricket if the match between Germany and Belgium includes 21 South Asians and one Aussie? Particularly when practically all of these players would be unlikely to make any decent team in their own country?

And the German and Belgian sports fans would stick to watching their soccer, hockey or tennis players rather than cricket.

Tail piece: In the 3rd T20I Weston did not play so  the match could well be described as German South Asians vs Belgian South Asians.

 

A mockery of cricket (1)

Over the last year, the ICC has decided to give T20I status to ANY match between men’s sides (as well as women’s sides) from countries whose cricket boards are part of ICC. This is regardless of cricketing ability.

This also means that all T20Is starting from 2018-2019 (for women’s matches) and 2019 for men’ s matches are included in official statistics as well as official rankings.

You can see statistics on http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/stats/index.html or similar sites.

And ICC rankings can be seen here: http://www.relianceiccrankings.com/test/date-specific.php  for player rankings

and http://www.espncricinfo.com/rankings/content/page/211271.html  for team rankings.

One expected outcome was very one-sided matches, such as this:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/story/_/id/25749943/all-14-china-slump-lowest-women-t20i-total

in which China was all out for 14 in 10 overs, in reply to UAE’s 203/3 in 20 overs. China’s efforts included 6 ducks and an unbeaten 0.

From the scorecard http://www.espncricinfo.com/series/19111/scorecard/1171353/china-women-vs-united-arab-emirates-women-group-a-thailand-womens-t20-smash-2018-19

we see that China at least has all or most of the players from their own country, while UAE’s team seems to include players from India, Pakistan and Sri Lanka with a token local player (much like the UAE’s men’s teams of the past).

Knowing the Chinese, they will gradually get better and will probably be challenging established teams after a few years. At the time of writing in May 2019, you can see that UAE is ranked 16th and China 75th (out of 79). China is one of the 6 teams with zero points.

If this is a mockery of international cricket, there is a still bigger mockery when the national team of a Western European country entirely consists of South Asians. And that is true of men’s cricket as well. This will be covered next.

Review of India – Aus T20Is-2019

A total of 20 T20Is have been played between India and Australia. Here is the summary of all results:

Result table

And the summary of the matches in India:

Series history

Considering bilateral matches in a series of at least 2 matches, we see that the 2017 series was drawn 1-1 and this series was won 2-0 by Australia.

Coming to individual performances:

Batting:

100 or more runs:

Runs-100

Kohli is far ahead of the others. Watson and Maxwell are the only ones to score centuries. The most 50+ scores are by Kohli (6 with no centuries) and 3 each by RG Sharma, Watson and Yuvraj.

Highest individual scores (50 and above):

Maxwell’s 113* was the highest for Australia in India, surpassing AJ Finch’s 89 in 2013.

Innings-50

Bowling:

Most wickets (5 and above):

Bowling-5

Bumrah has moved into the lead.

Best innings bowling (includes all 3wi and above):

Innings bowl-3

Bumrah’s 3-16 is the best for India at home, surpassing the earlier 3-26 by Vinay Kumar in 2013. The overall best performance was by Ashwin in the 2014 World Championship.

Fielding:

Most dismissals (4 or more dismissals):

Fielding-4

Dhoni has the most stumpings and catches by a keeper. Kohli has the most catches by a non-keeper.

Best innings dismissals (2 and above):

Innings field

All-round performance:

100 runs and 5 wickets:

AR-overall

Clearly they are the best all-rounders in these teams.

Match performance (20 runs and 2 wickets):

AR-match

Watson’s effort is the best here.

The same teams continue with a 5-match ODI series.

Summary of India’s tours to Australia

This was India’s first victory in a Test series in Australia, in 12 Test series going back to 1947-48.

This was India’s first victory in a bilateral ODI series in Australia. This was only the second such series, Australia having won the first in 2015-2016.

If you count ODI series with more than 3 teams, India had won the Commonwealth Bank series in 2007-08, where Australia was the losing finalist and Sri Lanka was the third participant.

And there was the B & H World Championship in 1984-85, where Pakistan was the losing finalist and all 7 Test teams of that period took part. India won all 5 of their matches, and the series was immortalized by Shastri’s Audi.

India did not win this T20I series, which was drawn 1-1 with one “no result”. However India had won the only other 3-match series in 2015-16 3-0. That was the only time that a visiting team had made a clean sweep of any series in Australia in a series of 3 or more matches in ANY format of cricket.

The worst defeat for Australia at home would appear to be England’s 2-0 victory in the 1886-87 Test series. Or perhaps England’s 5-1 victory against a Packerized team in 1978-79.

To put it differently, this was the first time that Australia failed to win a series in ANY format of cricket during a tour. Perhaps they will have better luck with Sri Lanka in the latter half of their season. Sri Lanka is to play 2 Tests and no other matches.

While many teams have separate captains for Tests, ODIs and T20Is, India had Virat Kohli as captain in all 3 formats.His counterpart was TD Paine in Tests and AD Finch in ODIs and T20Is.

T20Is of 2018

The Test cricket caravan for 2018 finally comes to an end on December 30.

Meanwhile we look at the T20Is of 2018, which had concluded earlier in the month.

Here are the ICC rankings at the end of the year:

Team rankings

And the teams arranged by win/loss ratio:

Team performance

Here Afghanistan has a clean sweep, including minnows as well as regulars such as Bangladesh. Pakistan has a more valid claim to the top position, as they do in the ICC rankings.

Some statistics for individual performances are given below. As in the above table, the one match involving the ICC XI is not counted.

Most runs: 250 and above:

T20I batting-250

Shikhar Dhawan is far ahead of the rest.

Highest innings: 90 and above:

T20I innings-90

AJ Finch is far ahead of the rest.

Most wickets: 10 and above:

Bowling-10 wkt

The lesser known AJ Tye has the most wickets.

Best innings bowling: includes all cases of 4wi and above:

Bowling-4wi

Most dismissals: 10 and above:

Dismissals

Sarfraz and Finch head the lists for keepers and non-keepers respectively.

All-round match performances: 30 runs and 3 wickets:

AR match

GJ Maxwell and Shakib Al Hasan have the best performances here.

From 2019 onwards, all T20I matches will be considered official and there will be no select list of T20I countries as there is for ODIs. So matches including presently unranked teams will figure in these statistics, as it already does with women’s T20I matches.