All-round fails in T20Is

Note: Data as on 25th March 2017:

Having covered batting, bowling and fielding fails in the three formats of cricket, we finally turn our attention to all-round fails in T20Is. For all-round performance we take the cases of (batting + bowling) as well as (batting + bowling + fielding).

No runs or wickets in T20Is (2 or more matches):

No wickets no runs

Mostly lesser-known players here except for MS Sinclair, who was a prominent Test batsman who was at the end of his career when he turned to T20Is. Other Test players include current SL player Nuwan Pradeep and earlier player Ruchira Perera whose bowling action was generally under a cloud. The popular heavyweight Dwayne Leverock is also here.

As you can see, several of the players listed above took catches and stumpings. We now look at those who did not manage any fielding dismissals besides runs and wickets.

No runs or wickets or dismissals in T20Is (2 or more matches):

No wickets or runs or disms

A shorter list, but still including a handful of Test players. At least they did get to field. Note that the Irish player GJ McCarter has the record to himself.Later we will see some who never got a chance to field in their T20I careers.

No batting or bowling in T20Is (complete list):

No batting or bowling

Several wicketkeepers here, including Ambrose, de Saram and Vilas who played several Tests for England, Sri Lanka and South Africa respectively. Note the special cases of Mol and Schoonheim, which are covered below:

No batting, bowling or fielding in T20Is (complete list):

No batting 0r bowling or fielding

These two players were scheduled to play in a T20I which was completely rained off. But the toss had taken place, and under ICC guidelines the match is included in player records. Not all statisticians will agree with this guideline, which has covered a few more matches (including one between India and Scotland at the first T20I world championship in 2007).

While Mol did play a few ODIs, Schoonheim did not represent his country on any other occasion.

Involved in all ten dismissals in an innings

If you are reading this, you would be aware that bowlers have taken all ten wickets in an innings on two occasions-Jim Laker in 1956 and Anil Kumble in 1999.

You may have imagined that there must have been some other instances where someone took wickets and catches when added together totaled ten. This thought may have occurred to many in the Ind vs Eng Test at Chennai, when “Sir” Ravindra Jadeja took 7 wickets and 3 catches in the 3rd innings: http://www.espncricinfo.com/india-v-england-2016-17/engine/match/1034817.html

However, this was not so. Look at the scorecard of this innings carefully:

Jadeja Chennai

Jadeja took 7 wickets, missing out on Bairstow, Dawson and Rashid. He did catch Bairstow and Rashid but was NOT involved in the dismissal of Dawson. His third catch was the caught-and-bowled dismissal of Jennings. So he had a hand in 9 of the 10 dismissals.

To identify all these cases, we look at the instances of

10 wickets (no doubt)

9 wickets plus 1 or more catches

8 wickets plus 2 or more catches

7 wickets plus 3 or more catches (e.g. Sir Ravindra)

There are no instances of 6 wickets and 4 or more catches.

These cases are summarized below:

All Ten

By the process used in Jadeja’s example we identify only FOUR such cases: Laker, Kumble, Hadlee and Tayfield where the bowler had a hand in all ten wickets. The match scorecards can be seen here:

Laker: http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/62814.html

Kumble: http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/63829.html

Hadlee: http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/engine/match/63415.html

Tayfield:http://www.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/match/62823.html

The cases of Laker and Kumble need no explanation.

In Hadlee’s case, he caught Lawson off VR Brown’s bowling to add to his 9 wickets.

In Tayfield’s case, he caught Insole off Goddard’s bowling to add to his 9 wickets, which included his second catch of Cowdrey (caught and bowled).

And this list does include a genuine knight in Sir Richard Hadlee, unlike the unrecognized knight from Saurashtra.

 

 

 

The first 100 Tests

With the conclusion of Bangladesh’s Test at the PSS ground at Colombo, all Test-playing countries have completed 100 Tests. It is interesting to see how the teams have fared during the first 100 Tests.

You might think that Australia did the best in its first 100 Tests? Wrong. And which team recorded the least wins in its first 100 Tests? Bangladesh? Wrong again.

There are various ways in which we can look at team performance. First we start with the raw data, in which the abandoned Tests with no play are not counted.

Raw data

First we see this table with teams arranged in order of wins in their first 100 Tests:

Order-Wins

England is a little ahead of Australia here. And Bangladesh won more Tests than New Zealand did. Zimbabwe is just ahead of India, which is in 8th place.

Then they can be arranged in order of Win/Loss Ratio:

Order-WLR

England is still on top, while the West Indies is just ahead of Australia. Beyond Australia, there are wide gaps though it is interesting to see Zimbabwe ahead of New Zealand and Bangladesh. Older cricket literature (prior to the 1960s) is often quite dismissive of New Zealand’s Test teams. India is in 7th place here.

For Percentage Score, we consider a win earning one point and a draw earning half a point.

Hence Australia with 42 wins, 40 losses and 18 draws has a score (or percentage score for 100 Tests) of 42 + 0.5 * 18= 42 + 9 = 51.0

So here is the table in order of Percentage Score:

Order-Percent

We consider Australia ahead of the West Indies as they had more wins (42 against 35).

After Australia and the West Indies there is a fairly wide spread, with Zimbabwe and Bangladesh at the bottom. India is in 6th place.

Looking back at the different tables we can see that South Africa, New Zealand and India did not win many Tests in their early years but were somewhat more successful in drawing matches when compared to Zimbabwe and Bangladesh. And Australian performances were not consistent until part of the 20th century had elapsed. On the whole, Pakistan and Sri Lanka picked up faster than India. In fact Pakistan has the most draws among the teams, followed by India.

 

 

 

A landmark win for Bangladesh

Bangladesh has now completed 100 Tests. They marked the 100th Test with their 9th Test victory. Here are the 9 Test victories in chronological order:

BD wins

This can be summarized as:

Won 1-0 at home vs Zimbabwe in 2004-05

Won 2-0 away vs West Indies in 2009

Drew 1-1 away vs Zimbabwe in 2013

Won 3-0 at home vs Zimbabwe in 2014-15

Drew 1-1 at home vs England in 2016-17

Drew 1-1 away vs Sri Lanka in 2016-17

Today’s win was their first Test victory against Sri Lanka (and in Sri Lanka).

At this point we can review the performances of Bangladeshi players in these 9 Test victories.

Runs: 100 and above:

BD batt-overall

Tamim, Shakib and Mushfiqur played in 8 of the 9 wins. They only missed the one in 2004-05. Tamim scored 4 centuries and 2 fifties in these matches, as you can see in the table below.

Highest innings (90 and above):

BD batt-innings

Bowling (5 or more wickets):

BD bowl overall

Shakib far ahead of the others with Taijul as a surprise second, with newcomer Miraz rapidly moving up.

Best innings bowling (5wi and above):

BD bowl innings

The one-Test heroes Taijul and Enamul head the list. Otherwise there is mainly Shakib, but do not forget Mahmudullah’s fiver on debut as well as the emergence of MH Miraz.

Best match bowling (7 or more wickets):

BD bowl-match

Headed by Miraj and Shakib. Shakib scored a century in the same match.

Most fielding dismissals (5 and above):

BD field-overall

Headed by Mushfiqur who kept in all but the 2005 match. Khaled Mashud was the keeper then. Mahmudullah and Mominul have the most catches as non-keepers.

Innings fielding dismissals (3 or more):

BD field-innings

Mainly Mushfiqur, though Soumya Sarkar has the most (4) catches by a non-keeper.

Match fielding dismissals (4 or more):

BD field-match

As above, headed by Mushfiqur for keepers and Soumya for non-keepers.

All-round performance (minimum 250 runs and 5 wickets):

BD AR overall

Shakib followed by Mahmudullah (who was dropped for the current match).

All-round performance in match (fifty and five-for):

BD AR match

Includes M. Rafique, the only all-rounder in the early Tests and two efforts by Shakib. This includes the century and ten wickets at Khulna, which puts him on the same level as Botham and Imran.

You can also see this piece written at the time of the victory over England a few months ago:

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2016/10/31/bangladeshs-greatest-test-win/

Fielding fails in T20Is

(Data correct as on 14 Mar 2017)

After looking at batting and bowling fails in all three formats, we turn our attention to those who failed to make any fielding dismissal in their careers.

Here we have these players arranged in order of innings fielded:

Nodis-inngs

Amir Hamza of Afghanistan leads by a large margin over the better known Rangana Herath, currently the Sri Lankan Test captain and the only current Test player who made his debut in the 1990s.

Amir Hamza is an useful bowler but not much of a batsman either. But he is a regular for ODIs and T20Is at the moment.

A number of other somewhat well-known international players appear here, including some Test players.

You can see that the results would be virtually the same if you arrange them in order of matches played.

Now we look at wicket-keepers who have failed to dismiss anyone:

Nodis-inngs-wk

A number of Test and ODI players here, who have at least made some dismissals at those levels. The leader here is Regis Chakabva (9 Tests, 9 dismissals) followed by Carlton Baugh  (no less than 21 Tests, 43 catches and 5 stumpings). NV Ojha has played one Test and one ODI and has made dismissals in both.

Finally, we look at those who never fielded in their T20I career:

Nofield

Nothing profound here. These two players from Netherlands were involved in a washed-out game against Ireland in 2008. As the toss was made, ICC rules state that this match counts in their career records. (Statisticians may disagree; as some disregard matches involving the ICC XI and their like, perhaps these matches should also be disregarded).

While Mol did play several ODIs, Schoonheim did not play for his country on any other occasion.

Bowling fails in Test matches

Continuing the thread from here:

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2017/03/07/bowling-fails-in-odis/

Here we consider the bowlers who failed to take a wicket in their Test careers. They do include some specialist bowlers who lost their Test place quickly, but are more likely to be batsmen with limited bowling ability who sometimes bowled a few overs to give some rest to the regular bowlers. There are even some wicket-keepers who bowled a little.

We start with the most runs conceded without taking a wicket (90 runs and above):

Most runs no wkt

We can see that there are some specialist bowlers with short careers as well as well-known batsmen (notably GA Headley, Habibul Bashar and K Srikkanth). Srikkanth was more successful in ODIs where he took two fivers. But it is the forgotten AH Monir of Bangladesh who heads this list.

Now for the most balls bowled without taking a wicket (150 balls and above):

Most balls no wkt

JL Hopwood was close to the top in the first table and heads this table. He had the misfortune to bowl against a strong Australian lineup with Bradman and friends. Headley comes next followed by Monir. As above, there is a mix of specialist bowlers and part-timers.

Most innings bowled without taking a wicket (6 and above):

Most innings no wkt

Srikkanth heads this list-perhaps he and Headley can be considered as the most determined of the part-timers. Many others like Bradman and Gavaskar bowled on rare occasions but did take at least one wicket. So did some keepers such as Boucher and Kirmani (not to forget AF Lyttleton’s 4-wicket haul). Some current players such as Kohli and Voges have so far been unsuccessful.

Most matches played without taking a wicket (75 and above):

Most matches no wkt

Sangakkara and Stewart (who kept wicket in most of their Tests) head this list, though there are also non-keepers like Lara, Strauss, Inzamam and Vengsarkar near the top. And there are some who never bowled throughout their long Test careers. More about them later. For now, we look at

Most matches played by non-keepers without taking a wicket (75 and above):

most matches no wkt (nk)

Note Fleming and Strauss who played the most Tests without ever bowling. We look into this category further:

Most matches played without ever bowling (50 and above):

most matches never bowled

Many keepers in this list, so we look at the non-keepers.

Most matches played by non-keepers without ever bowling (50 and above):

Most matches never bowled (nk)

SP Fleming heads this list, followed by Strauss and Misbah.

While wicketless players do not have a bowling average or a strike rate, they do have an economy rate. We close with

Best economy rate for those who never took a wicket (150 balls and above):

Best econ rate

Oddly enough this is headed by Australian RJ Quiney who is not a regular bowler in domestic cricket. A few other part-timers (LS Darling and Roope to begin with) have better economy rates than the specialist bowlers. We have already met AH Monir who is the most expensive here. We may as well learn more about him:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/bangladesh/content/player/56235.html

The Test debutants of 2016-2

We complete this review with a look at the fielding and all-round performances of those who made their Test debut in 2016.

Of the 44 debutants, only one, PJ Moor of Zimbabwe, was a wicket-keeper. He took precisely one catch on debut. So whatever we have here is applicable to non-keepers.

Most dismissals in an innings (2 or more):

Debut inn field

Most dismissals in a match (4 or more):

Debut mat field

Hameed and Raval have the best performances here, as well as in batting and fielding (see below). The South Asian diaspora seems to be coming along well.

All-round performances (at least 30 runs and 3 wickets in match):

Debut mat AR

All-round performances (at least 30 runs and 3 dismissals in match):

Debut match ARF