Batting recoveries 1: Doubling the score by the 10th wicket partners

There are only 6 occasions when a Test innings score has been doubled after the 9th wicket fell:

Doubling after 9th wicket fell

Interestingly, this first happened over 100 years after the first Test.

3 of these 6 instances have come since the beginning of 2018. No 11 batsmen have become more skilled in handling collapses šŸ™‚

The Hughes-Agar partnership is the highest (163) and has the best ratio of (10th wicket partnership) / (sum of 1st to 9th wicket partnerships): 1.393

Agar’s 98 remains the best at No 11 in all Tests. He was making his debut (as a pure bowler).

At the other end of the scale, Roach and Cummins just succeeded in equalling the 50 made by the first 9 wickets.

There are two instances (Lyon and Murtagh) where the No 11 batsman was the top scorer of the innings.

The only such effort which did not end in a loss was the one in 1980.

Next we will come to doubling after the 8th and 7th wickets fell.

Four wickets in an innings on debut and never again

In earlier posts we have covered topics such as:

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2019/09/26/century-on-debut-and-never-again/

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2019/10/26/50-plus-on-test-debut-and-never-again/

https://abn397.wordpress.com/2019/10/11/five-wickets-in-an-innings-and-never-again/

We now extend this to four (or more) wickets in an innings on debut and never again:

Four+ wickets in innings

A total of 96 players took four or more wickets in an innings on debut. Of these, 11 took four or more in each innings. Those listed here never took a four+ again.

You can see the famous cases of CS Marriott (11 wickets in his only Test) and others with a 10-for on debut (SF Burke, HHH Johnson, F Martin and Mohammad Zahid) who did not even manage a four-for later.Ā  Also WH Ashley with a 7-for in his only innings bowled. Most had rather short careers.

The best innings performances here are 8-215 (JJ Krezja), 7-81 (M de Lange) and 7-95 (WH Ashley).

Then there was the strange case of the two unrelated players SA Banerjee and SN Banerjee who both took 4wi on debut in the 1948-49 I vs WI series and never played again.

Differences between home and away bowling averages

Here, we consider the differences for the 261 players who have bowled at least 2000 balls in home and away/neutral Tests.

The full list of Home average-Away/Neutral average can be seen in this spreadsheet.

sorted home advantage

This is for Tests up to Oct 25, 2019. The 2005 Test involving the ICC XI is not included.

However, you may find it simpler to look at the top 40, whose home average has the greatest positive differenceĀ  with the away/neutral average. Or those who derive the greatest advantage from home conditions.

Note that some prominent players do not feature here as they have not bowled 2000 balls in one of the two categories.

Many of the current Pakistani players are not here because they have played few or no Tests at home.

Those with the strongest home advantage:

Bowling-max home advantage

We see that JDP Oram (NZ) followed by CR Woakes (Eng) and MH Miraj (BD) have the greatest home advantage, with Oram having a large lead. The leaders from other countries areĀ  TW Wall (Aus), BC Strang (Zim), SLV Raju (Ind), RL Chase (WI), Abdul Qadir (Pak), BM McMillan (SA) and MDK Perera (SL). Some of them, particularly the spinners such s Miraj, Raju and Qadir are known to have done much better at home.

Those with the weakest home advantage:

Bowling-least home advantage

Some relatively lesser known names at the top, apart from Worrell who was not a regular bowler for most of his Test career. RDB Croft (Eng) leads by a large margin over the next FM Worrell (WI) and PJ Wiseman (NZ). The leaders from other countries are IK Pathan (Ind), GRJ Matthews (Aus), RAS Lakmal (SL), Mushtaq Mohammad (Pak) and AA Donald (SA). We have to go beyond the top 40 to find Shakib Al Hasan (BD) at #90 and PA Strang (Zim) at #120.

Pathan was fortunate to play two away series against the particularly weak teams of Bangladesh and Zimbabwe.

The median value is -3.36 (NAT Adcock, PH Edwards). This implies that an average bowler would be expected to have a home average about 3 more than his away/neutral average.

Those with a difference near zero are MA Holding (0.10) and HJ Tayfield and Shakib Al Hasan (-0.14). They are among the best bowlers from their countries, and did equally well at home and away.

More about bowling averages

Ever wondered about the average of Test bowling averages?

If we take all Tests up to Oct 25, 2019 and disregarding the Test involving the ICC XI in 2005, and a cutoff of 2000 balls bowled:

There are 613 bowlers fitting this criteria. A full statement:

Bowling averages-final

The bowling averages range from GA Lohmann’s 10.75 to EAR de Silva’s 129.00, which is the only 3-figure bowling average.

The average or mean bowling average is 34.45, which corresponds to that of JE Taylor and KD Mackay.

Looking at other measures of central tendency:

First quartile: 28.24 (SP Jones, RJ Sidebottom, HC Griffith)

Median: 32.92 (BL Cairns, L Amarnath)

Third quartile: 38.59 (AMB Rowan).

We also have the Economy Rate, which ranges from 1.31 runs/over for W Attewell to 4.16 for Shahadat Hossain.

The average is 2.75 (DK Lillee, RM Hogg)

And the Strike Rate, which ranges from 34.10 balls/wicket by GA Lohmann to 291.00 by EAR de Silva. Remember that they have the best and worst bowling averages as well.

We may as well have a closer look at them:

http://www.espncricinfo.com/england/content/player/16337.html

http://www.espncricinfo.com/srilanka/content/player/48456.html

The average is 76.10 by Iqbal Qasim.

Next we will take up the difference between home and away bowling averages, as was done for batting averages in a recent post.

 

 

More about batting averages

Here is the table showing the batting averages for all 1105 players who batted in at least 20 innings up to 25 Oct 2019:

Averages Oct 2019-Complete

The averages range from 99.94 (DG Bradman) to 2.00 (M Mbangwa).

The mean of these averages is 27.07, and those closest to it are KR Rutherford, JJ Lyons and PA Strang.

Looking at other measures of central tendency:

First quartile: 36.16 (Wasim Raja)

Median: 26.52 (PR Reiffel, RW Marsh)

Third quartile: 16.28 (RW Taylor, BL Cairns)

 

Differences between home and away batting averages

A common topic of discussion among cricket’s number-crunchers is the difference between home and away batting averages.

Here, we consider the differences for the 534 players who have batted in at least 20 innings both in home and away/neutral Tests.

The full list of Home average-Away/Neutral average can be seen in this spreadsheet.

Home-away main display

This is for Tests up to Oct 25, 2019. The 2005 Test involving the ICC XI is not included.

However, you may find it simpler to look at the top 40, whose home average has the greatest positive differenceĀ  with the away/neutral average. Or those who derive the greatest advantage from home conditions.

Note that some prominent players such as RG Sharma do not feature here as they have not completed 20 innings in one of the two categories.

Many of the current Pakistani players are not here because they have played few or no Tests at home.

Highest Home-Away

The top positions are the unlikely trio of VS Hazare, Kamran Akmal and Mominul Haque-all from the Asian teams. Next come Rowe and Walcott from the West Indies. Warner, Khawaja and Clarke are the highest among Australians, Compton and May from the English, HP Tillakratne from Sri Lanka, HW Taylor from South Africa, McCullum from New Zealand and GJ Whittall from Zimbabwe.

We now go to the other extreme, those who have the greatest negative difference, or those who derive the strongest advantage from away and neutral conditions.

Lowest Home and Away

Unlike in the first table, the first few positions are from a wider variety of teams.

BC Broad (Eng) has the only such difference less than -30. While he had a reasonable career as a batsman, his bowler son ST Broad is better known.

Then other leaders from their teams are DM Bravo (WI), S Wettimuny (SL), M Amarnath (Ind), PA Strang (Zim), WR Endean (SA), JW Burke (Aus), JR Reid (NZ), Saleem Yousuf (Pak). Perhaps it is understandable that there is no one from Bangladesh in the top 40. The best from BD is Javed Omar (102nd with -2.83).

The median difference among the 534 players is 3.14, matched by RJ Shastri and GG Arnold. That might imply that most batsmen would be expected to average 3 runs more at home than away/neutral.

Those closest to a zero difference (whose batting averages are practically the same home and away) are Waqar Younis (-0.04) along with HM Amla (0.09 ) and Intikhab Alam (-0.10)

In case you are wondering, DG Bradman is 457th out of 534, being one of those who did better away. His difference is 98.22-102.84 = -4.62.

 

 

The slowest ducks

The diamond ducks represent the quickest ducks, where the batsmen did not get to face a single ball. Here we look at the slowest ducks both by balls faced and by batting time.

Slowest ducks by balls faced:

Slowest ducks by balls

GI Allott’s 77-ball duckĀ  was in the first innings when New Zealand was facing a large score of 621/5 dec by South Africa. Allott helped CZ Harris put on 32 for the last wicket. New Zealand had to follow on but saved the match easily.

https://www.espncricinfo.com/series/15856/scorecard/63834/new-zealand-vs-south-africa-1st-test-south-africa-tour-of-new-zealand-1998-99

JM Anderson’s 55-ball duck was more tragic. He was known to be a stubborn batsman and it was not surprising that he hung on for 55 balls and 81 minutes, putting on 21 for the last wicket with MM Ali (who made a century in his second Test). However, Anderson was dismissed with one ball left:

https://www.espncricinfo.com/series/11718/scorecard/667901/england-vs-sri-lanka-2nd-investec-test-sri-lanka-tour-of-england-and-ireland-2014

Sri Lanka thus won the 2-Test series 1-0. What was more ironic was that they had drawn the first Test with the last pair at the wicket, although the last man N Pradeep only needed to survive 5 balls.

From recent times we have ML Cummins (45 balls) vs India in 2019.

Slowest ducks by minutes batted:

slowest ducks by time.JPG

Allott and Anderson head this list as well. Here we have a couple of older instances where the number of balls faced is not known.

From recent times we have India’s JJ Bumrah (52 minutes, 14 balls). and WI’s AS Joseph (51 min, 22 balls). It appears that most tailenders are capable of such innings once in a while, even if they do not score runs.

To round this off we have these tables which include unbeaten zeroes:

Slowest unbeaten zeroes by balls faced:

Slowest unbeaten ducks by balls

Slowest unbeaten zeroes by minutes batted:

Slowest unbeaten ducks by time

The slowest unbeaten zero is by AP Sheahan (52 minutes, 44 balls). This came in a follow-on after Australia had been dismissed for 78 in a rare collapse. Sheahan was a regular batsman unlike the tailenders mentioned above.

Australia saved this match while the series was drawn. Like most Ashes series of the 1960s, it was marked by slow batting.

https://www.espncricinfo.com/series/17293/scorecard/63024/england-vs-australia-2nd-test-australia-tour-of-england-1968

There are no long-drawn out unbeaten zeroes in recent years.