When India held over half the ODI partnership records

At the turn of the century, Indian batsmen held more than half the ODI partnership records. To be precise, the partnerships for the first five wickets plus the 9th wicket.

On 31 December, 1999, these were the partnership records for ODIs:

1st: SC Ganguly and SR Tendulkar, 252 vs SL, Colombo (Premadasa), 07/07/1998

2nd: SR Tendulkar and R Dravid, 331 vs NZ, Hyderabad (Deccan), 08/11/1999

3rd: R Dravid and SR Tendulkar, 237* v Ken, Bristol, 23/05/1999

4th: M Azharuddin and A Jadeja, 275* v Zim, Cuttack, 09/04/1998

5th: M Azharuddin and A Jadeja, 223 v SL, Colombo (Premadasa), 17/08/1997

The other record ODI partnerships on that date were:

6th: MO Odumbe and AV Vadher, 161, Ken v SL, Southampton, 30/05/1999

7th: TM Odoyo and AO Suji, Ken v Zim, 119, Nairobi (Aga), 16/10/1997

8th: PR Reiffel and SK Warne, 160, Aus v SA, Port Elizabeth, 04/04/1994

9th: Kapil Dev and SMH Kirmani, 126*, Ind v Zim, Tunbridge Wells, 18/06/1983

10th: IVA Richards and MA Holding, 106*, WI v Eng, Manchester, 31/05/1984

Note that the 4th and 10th wicket records mentioned above are still the world ODI records at the time of writing (29/10/2017).

Where trains do not run any more (2019)

Copyrights of the pictures rest with the respective photographers.

Some stations to which no passenger train runs now.

First, one in Gujarat where the railway line does not exist now:

Ghanta

The picture was taken in around 1980. The station was on the long-closed NG line from Champaner Road to Pani Mines, near Vadodara.

There are many narrow gauge lines in Gujarat which have closed over the last few decades. Those which survived until the 2010s will ultimately be converted to broad gauge.

Another of these ill-fated NG lines was the Samlaya-Dabhoi section which was affected by floods some years ago . Here are some remnants:

Samlaya NG

Samlaya’s NG station. The BG station can be seen in the background.

Here is one of the wayside stations:

Vagodiya (NG)

Next we come to the Chennai area, where EMUs used to run until a few years ago. The line to Anna Nagar branched off from Villivakkam. Departmental trains still run there, since the furnishing division of ICF is situated near Anna Nagar.

 

In Tamil Nadu, there are numerous abandoned branch lines which closed between the 1960s and 1980s. Some branches, such as the one to Mannargudi, have been rebuilt in recent years. The branch to Mettur Dam was reopened for passenger traffic after a long gap. And Karaikal has been connected through a new branch.

Perhaps the most well-known abandoned terminus is Dhanushkodi. This is all that you will see now:

Dhanushkodi

The cyclone of December 1964 resulted in the closure of the Pamban-Dhanushkodi section, which was listed as the “main line” in timetables of that period. Damage to the line was extensive enough to result in it being abandoned and the branch to Rameswaram now became the main line with ferries to Talaimannar in Sri Lanka.

The disturbances in Sri Lanka from 1983 put an end to the ferry services. Though the civil war is now over and the connecting lines in Sri Lanka are functioning again, it is unlikely that the ferries will run in the foreseeable future. But Rameswaram, unlike Dhanushkodi, has enough traffic to justify train services to all parts of India.

This was once the easternmost point of IR, though the extension from Ledo was built only in the late 1950s. It was closed after the BG was extended to Ledo, and it was not felt worthwhile to convert the remaining line to Ledo to Lekhapani.

Lekhapani_station

However, one can see signs of economic activity here.

This was once the terminus at Ernakulam, once metre gauge and then broad gauge. It lost its importance in around 1940 when it was bypassed in a new alignment going to Ernakulam Town, Ernakulam Jn and Cochin Harbour Terminus. In its last years it was used only by departmental goods trains, and probably the last of them ran in 2001.

Ernakulam Goods

In the same area there is the once-thriving Cochin Harbour Terminus (CHTS). It began losing importance once the Ernakulam-Thiruvananthapuram line was converted to broad gauge in the mid-1970s, enabling long-distance trains to run to southern Kerala from Ernakulam Town/Junction bypassing CHTS.

Presently it has goods services but has not had passenger services since 2004. In July 2018 it was announced that DMU services would be started between Ernakulam Jn and CHTS.

Cochin Harbour

Update: A DMU service started in late September 2018, but was stopped after a few weeks. So CHTS is still without passenger trains.

Next to CHTS is Mattancheri Halt, practically abandoned but given a quick paint job to welcome the new DMU services:

Mattancheri

And there are these recently orphaned stations on the Lumding-Silchar section: (Bagetar is the one on the top left).

 

Here is the station at Lower Haflong after it was abandoned:

Lower Haflong closed

The abandoned alignment also includes the 1.9 km-long Longtarai tunnel between Lower Haflong and Ditokcherra.

Elsewhere in Assam, here is a current picture of Tezpur station. It is not likely to see trains again as there is insufficient space for broad gauge. Trains now terminate at the BG station at Dekargaon a few km to the north.

tezpur

In North Bengal, we have this former junction very close to the Bangladesh border:

Gitaldaha (abandoned)

It lost its importance after Partition as through trains ceased to run across the border. A newer station was built some distance away from the border and was called New Gitaldaha Jn. Limited trains continued to run to Gitaldaha according to the 1963 timetable, though it is not listed in timetables of the 1970s.

Oddly enough, no picture of New Gitaldaha is available on the net though it has a fair amount of passenger traffic now.

Our next stop is also in West Bengal, but on a more optimistic note:

Petrapole-2

This lies on the east of Bangaon, close to the border with Bangladesh. It saw some passenger traffic with the Sealdah/Khulna Barisal Express for some years up to the 1965 war. After that no traffic crossed the border for 25 years or more. Later goods trains from India started using the track-in 2008 many IR wagons could be seen at sidings on stations between Khulna and Jessore.

Finally a weekly express between Kolkata and Khulna started running in November 2017.

Then there were the famous narrow gauge lines of Martin Burn which ran useful commuter services on 2’0″ gauges into Howrah Maidan. They closed in around 1970. The Howrah-Amta line was converted to BG and electrified, though the Bargachia-Champadanga section remains closed.

The sister line from Howrah to Sheakhala  with the short branch from Chanditala to Janai remains as it was. However, some relics can still be seen:

 

Ghost stations such as the older Madgaon station exist or existed until recently. The old station lies on the Konkan line about a km north of the present station.

In Hyderabad, one can see traces of platforms at Husain Sagar which was listed in timetables at least till the 1970s. A little west of Lingampalli we can see the abandoned station of Telapur on the closed line to Patancheru. That line functioned only for a few years. The expected industrial boom in the then PM’s constituency of Medak never materialized.

And the former terminus at Patancheru is taken over by vegetation:

Patancheru

Update: Local services were resumed in mid-2019 up to Ramachandrapuram, one station before Patancheru.

Often, old stations are bypassed or lose importance in the course of construction of a new line or bridge. Many such stations in the present NF zone were rebuilt at new locations starting in the late 1940s, which accounts for the number of “New” prefixes in this area (Think of NJP and NBQ to begin with).

One such example in Bihar is Mungeri Lal’s hometown. Here are the old and new stations:

 

 

 

 

Travels in Chennai-ancient signboards

Our first stop is at Basin Bridge Jn (BBQ), where we have examples of ancient and modern signboards:

The food-minded may wish to hold a BBQ here, though you may have to first find a military hotel nearby.

Nearby there is Washermanpet, though the sign painters have some doubts about the name:

The official name is Washermanpet in the timetables. Also note the mis-spelling of the Hindi name. No picture of any new signboard seems to be available on the net.

Some years ago I have seen signs with Chromepet and Cromepet co-existing. Another well-known case is Hafizpet/Hafizpeta in the Hyderabad area.

An example of a run-down signboard in a totally run-down station:

Royapuram

Again, no picture of a new signboard is seen on the net. Tragic, as this station has the oldest surviving station building in India.  It was the first terminus in Madras where trains started running to Arcot (now Walajah Road) in 1856. The old terminuses in Mumbai and Kolkata had opened before this but the station buildings do not exist now. However, it now boasts a new electric loco shed.

Another station which is particularly obscure, as it does not seem to be mentioned in timetables even though it has a booking office which issues tickets. No picture of any new signboard can be located.

Pattabiram military siding

 

Review of Pakistan-Sri Lanka Tests

The 2-Test series in the UAE ended in a 2-0 win for Sri Lanka, which was the first defeat for Pakistan in the UAE since they moved there in 2010. The earlier series between Pakistan and Sri Lanka in the UAE have had an 1-0 win by Pakistan in 2011-12 and an 1-1 draw in 2013-14.

Here is the summary of all Tests between these teams:

Overall results

As we can see, the teams have been quite evenly matched-particularly in the UAE which has seen an equal number of wins by Pakistan, wins by Sri Lanka and draws.

We now look at individual statistics.

Batting: Most runs (750 and above):

Pak-SL runs

Sangakkara is far ahead of Younis who is also far ahead of the next (M. Jayawardene). Among those who played in this series, Azhar Ali is the only one with above 1000 runs although Asad Shafiq and others are catching up.

The most centuries are 10 by Sangakkara, followed by 8 by Aravinda and Younis.

The most scores of 50+ are 22 by Sangakkara, followed by 14 by Younis.

Highest individual scores (150 and above):

innings

This includes a triple century and several double centuries. This series was  somewhat low-scoring as the highest score was “only” 196 by Karunaratne. Note the Test at Faisalabad in October 1985 where two Pakistani batsmen scored double centuries in the same innings which were almost equal (203* and 206).

Batting averages (Minimum 20 innings, average 30 and above):

Batting average

Sangakkara is well ahead of the others, while the next two Inzamam and Mathews have almost identical averages. Among those who played in this series, the highest averages are by Azhar Ali, Asad Shafiq and Kaushal Silva.

Now for bowling:

Most wickets (20 and above):

Wkts

Herath has moved ahead of Muralitharan (like he has done against a few other teams). Saeed Ajmal has the most by Pakistan. Other current players here include Yasir Shah and Dilruwan Perera.

Herath has the most fivers (8) while three others have 5.

Herath is also the only one with more than one tenner.

Best innings bowling (all instances of 6wi and above):

innings bowling

Herath and Yasir Shah appear from the current series.

Best match bowling (all instances of 9wm and above):

Match bowling

Herath’s 11-wicket haul is the only one from the current series.

Bowling averages (Minimum 2000 balls, all instances):

Bowling average

The two Ws lead this table followed by Muralitharan and Herath.

To be precise, the best bowling averages are by Akram followed by Younis.

The best economy rates are by Akram followed by Abdur Rehman.

The best strike rates are by Younis followed by Akram (a reversal of the rankings for bowling average).

Now for fielding:

Most dismissals (15 and above):

Dismissals

Moin Khan has the most dismissals. However the fielder M. Jayawardene has more catches than him (37 to 35). Sarfraz Ahmed has the most stumpings (8). Younis Khan also has more catches (33) than any keeper other than Moin.

Note that several Sri Lankan players have played significant numbers of Tests as keepers and non-keepers. One of them (Dilshan) even took a few wickets as a bowler which theoretically makes him second to Walcott among the “triple all-rounders”.

Most innings dismissals (4 and above):

Innings fielding

Chandimal is the only keeper with 6 dismissals. Two fielders have 4 dismissals.

Most match dismissals (6 and above):

match fielding

The lesser-known of the Jayawardenes (the keeper, not the fielder) has 9 dismissals followed by K. Akmal and Chandimal with 8. However, Sarfraz Ahmed has the best innings and match performances in the current series.

Highest dismissal rate (Minimum 20 innings, 0.450 and above):

Dismissal rate

Headed by Moin Khan followed by Tillakaratne. Azhar Ali and Kaushal Silva appear from the current players, although Sarfraz Ahmed has not played enough in this series. However, he is soon likely to head this list.

Best overall all-round figures (see table for criteria):

AR-overall

The two best all-rounders of their teams at that time.

Best all-round match figures (fifty and fiver):

AR-match

Includes Saqlain (not really an all-rounder) and Dilruwan Perera from the current series, apart from Akram.

 

 

 

Chrome in Chromepet, Power in Powerpet

While travelling by train in the past, one would have often come across stations with strange-sounding names and wondered about the origin of the names. Now the internet has made it easy to answer these questions. To begin with, there is this suburban station between Chennai Beach and Tambaram:

Chrompet

It was listed in earlier maps and timetables as Chromepet. Now what is its connection with chrome?

The answer lies in: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromepet#Etymology

The name came from the Chrome Leather Works which used to have a large factory there.

Note the mismatch between the English and Hindi inscriptions.

Also in Chennai is this station with this antique signboard:

Washermanpet

As you would guess, the place gets its name from the humble dhobi:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washermanpet#History

Also note the misspelling of the Hindi inscription.

And this is its counterpart on the Singapore metro:

Dhoby Ghaut

The signboard reflects the run-down condition of Washermanpet and Royapuram, the latter being the oldest functioning station building on IR. It was the main terminus at Madras when trains started running in 1856. This signboard reflects the condition of the station which has somehow escaped demolition till now:

Royapuram

Finally, we visit this station next to Eluru in Andhra Pradesh:

Powerpet

Does it perhaps have something to do with the Marathas such as Sharad Pawar? Some of them spell their name as Powar*

However, Wikipedia has this to say:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powerpet

in which the name is said to be in honour of Sir Power, a railway engineer. I could not find anything else about him. But it is wrong usage, as the correct form is Sir Ravindra Jadeja and not Sir Jadeja.

*The Powar clan, however does seem to be connected to this station near Itarsi in Madhya Pradesh:

Powarkheda

Pakistan-a bastion crumbles.

First have a look at the entire history of Tests involving Pakistan at neutral venues:

Pakistan neutral

The 1999 match was part of the Asian Test championship which had the final played in Bangladesh, which was not a Test country at that time.

Apart from 9/11, an attack near the hotel where NZ’s team was staying in Karachi in early 2002 resulted in matches being moved out of the country. This began with a 3-Test series against Aus (with the first Test at Colombo and the next two at Sharjah). Australia won this 3-0.

After this, serious cricket returned to Pakistan for some years before the Lahore incident involving the SL team in Lahore in 2009 made it the last Test to be played in Pakistan.

Here are the matches played IN Pakistan since 1999:

Pakistan home

In this period Pakistan lost 2-1 to Sri Lanka in 2000, 1-0 to England later in 2000, 2-1 to India in 2004, and 1-0 to SA in 2007 before the end came in early 2009. The UAE become Pakistan’s adopted home from 2010 onwards, after one neutral series against Australia in England.

Although some series were drawn, Pakistan did record a 3-0 victory against England in 2012, and a 2-0 victory against Australia in 2014. While they beat WI 2-1 in late 2016, they lost 2-0 to Sri Lanka in the just concluded series. This involved their first loss at Abu Dhabi, and the first series loss in the UAE since 2010. And their last 3 Tests in the UAE have resulted in successive losses at Sharjah, Abu Dhabi and Dubai.

Certain venues like Bridgetown and Karachi were regarded as “fortresses” where visiting teams hardly ever won there. There are even such fortresses in domestic cricket including the IPL.

But the UAE may not be a fortress any more-which resulted in Pakistan moving from 1 to 7 in the rankings quite rapidly.

 

Review of South Africa-Bangladesh Tests (Oct 2017)

There have not been many Tests between these teams, so we can sum them up below:

SA-BD overall

SA has won 10 of the 12 Tests between these teams, and the two draws were in matches badly affected by rain. All 6 of the Tests in SA were won by SA, 5 by an innings. The sole exception was the first Test of this series, though that was practically an innings defeat as the sum of BD’s two innings was less than SA’s first innings.

With this small sample size, it is not worth studying averages but we look at other statistical points below:

Most runs (250 and above):

SA-BD batting

Several of these players played in the current series.

Amla and Smith scored 3 centuries apiece. They are also the only ones to make 4 scores of 50-plus.

Highest individual scores (75 and above):

SA-BD bat innings

One-sided indeed, although Mominul recorded BD’s highest score of 77 against SA. The previous record was 75 by H. Bashar in Bangladesh in 2003.

Most wickets (10 and above):

SA-BD wkts

Ntini and Steyn have a considerable lead over the others, though Bangladeshi bowlers also have a presence here.

Best innings bowling (including all 5wi and above):

SA-BD innings bowling

Interestingly, the three best bowling performances are by Bangladeshi bowlers-including Shakib who opted out of this series. Rabada’s two fivers in the current series are among the best for SA. Four bowlers have taken two fivers apiece.

Best match bowling (including all 7wm and above):

SA-BD match bowling

K Rabada’s 10-63 in the first Test is the best match analysis from either side. The only other 10-for is by PR Adams in 2003. For Bangladesh, the best is a 9-wicket haul by Shahadat in 2003.

Most fielding dismissals (5 and above):

SA-BD dismissals

Boucher is far ahead of the rest, while Liton Das moved on to BD’s highest tally of 8 dismissals. GC Smith has the most catches by a fielder (12).

Most innings dismissals (4 and above):

SA-BD innings dismissals

Liton Das is the only one to challenge Boucher. Markram has the most catches by a fielder (3).

Most match dismissals (4 and above):

SA-BD match fielding

Again a near-monopoly by Boucher. Pollock is the only fielder with 4 catches in a match.

All-round performance (50 and 5wi):

SA-BD Match AR

Only one instance by one of the best all-rounders in all Tests.