The Jodhpur Railway from the Bradshaw of June 1944

The Jodhpur Railway of those days was one of the small but well-run railway systems in the first half of the 20th century. The network (as shown in the June 1944 Indian Bradshaw) is:

Jodhpur1-1944Jodhpur2-1944

These are also in the IRFCA gallery’s Heritage section, though wrongly labelled as being from the 1943 Bradshaw.

It can be seen that after 1947 a part of this system (west of Munabao) became part of Pakistan’s railway system. Initially it was merged with the North Western Railway, then Pakistan Western Railway and finally Pakistan Railway.

The part remaining in India essentially became the Jodhpur Division of the Northern Railway and later the North Western Railway (which has nothing to do with the previous NWR).

Review of Bangladesh-Zimbabwe Tests (2020)-2

Hope that you have read Part 1

We now look at bowling records:

Most wickets (15 and above):

Most wkts-15

Taijul is far ahead of others.

He also has the most fivers (4) followed by Shakib and Enamul with 3. No one has more than one tenner.

Best innings bowling (6wi and above):

Innings bowl-6wi

Taijul again leads this table. However there was no haul of 6wi or more in this match.

Best match bowling (8wm and above):

Match bowl-8wm

Enamul’s 12-wicket haul was instrumental in Bangladesh’s first-ever Test win in 2005.

Shakib’s 10-for in 2014 was accompanied by a century. He is only the third player in all Tests to score a century and take a 10-for in the same match, after Botham and Imran.

Also note Nayeem Hasan’s 9-for in this match.

Fielding records:

Most dismissals (10 and above):

Fielding-10 dis

Led by Mushfiqur, while Masakadza has the most by a non-keeper.

Most dismissals in an innings (4 and above):

Inngs dis-4

Chakabva took 5 catches in this Test to equal the record. No non-keeper has taken 4 or more catches.

Most dismissals in a match (5 and above):

Match dis-5

The record of 7 was set long ago. Chakabva took 5 in this match.

Best dismissal rate (Min 15 innings, all instances):

Dis avg

Mushfiqur leads here, far ahead of the others.

All-round performance (Overall, see criteria in table):

AR overall

Shakib leads, followed by Chigumbura at a distance.

All-round match performance (50 and 5wi):

AR-match

Shakib’s century and 10wm has pride of place.

Review of Bangladesh-Zimbabwe Tests (2020)-1

These teams have met in 17 Tests, with these results:

BD v Zim results

These can be summarized as:

Result summary

The teams are now level at 7 wins each.

CR Ervine followed TW Latham as an one-Test captain.

This was only the 14th Test win by Bangladesh, and the second by an innings:

Bangladesh Test wins

Bangladesh’s first Test win (and series win) was against Zimbabwe in 2005.

Batting records:

Most runs (250 and above):

Most runs-250

Current and near-current players hold the first few places.

Taylor is the only one with 5 centuries. Taylor, Masakadza and Bashar have 7 50+ scores.

Highest innings scores (100 and above):

Highest scores-100

Mushfiqur’s double century in this series was less than his earlier record score in 2018. No one else has scored a double in these Tests.

Batting average (Min 15 innings, all instances):

Batting average

Mushfiqur is just ahead of Taylor.

Batting strike rate (Min 750 balls faced, all instances):

SR-all

Mominul and Taylor lead this table.

To be continued.

When India first won a Test and series abroad

You might think this relates to the victories over the West Indies and England in 1971, when Wadekar was the captain.

But the first time India won a Test outside India was in New Zealand in February 1968 when Pataudi was still the captain.

India lost the second Test but won the 4-match series 3-1. This is mostly forgotten now, particularly as New Zealand was not considered to be a strong team then.

Anyway, you can look through the old scorecards through this link, which covers all Tests played by India in New Zealand:

http://stats.espncricinfo.com/ci/engine/stats/index.html?class=1;filter=advanced;home_or_away=2;opposition=5;orderby=start;team=6;template=results;type=team;view=results

After this, India only won two further Tests in New Zealand. The first was in 1976 at Auckland. Later at Wellington the hitherto unknown Richard Hadlee ensured that his team squared the series 1-1. It is noteworthy that India’s win came when Gavaskar was standing in for captain Bedi, who captained in the rest of the series.

And in 2009, when Dhoni’s team won the series 1-0 after winning at Hamilton.

This year, the Tests are scheduled at Wellington and Christchurch. India had won at Wellington back in 1968, but have never won at Christchurch.

More recent name changes in Uttar Pradesh

Earlier we have dealt with the renaming of Allahabad Jn and nearby changes to reflect the old name of Prayagraj. There are a number of other name changes in UP over the last couple of years. Some are well known and others have been hardly mentioned in the media.

The most well known change was this:

Mughal Sarai

New Mughalsarai (DDU)

As in the case of Allahabad/Prayagraj, there was a long gap between the announcement of the change and its actual implementation. So a number of photoshopped pictures appeared in the local media, like this:

DDU @ MGS fake pic

As we know, Pandit Deen Dayal Upadhyaya was found dead near this station in 1968. The circumstances of his death have never been satisfactorily explained, and may well become a never-ending mystery like the deaths of Subhash Chandra Bose and Lal Bahadur Shastri.

Other changes which attracted less attention:

Farah Town (between Mathura and Agra Cantt) became Deen Dayal Dham – as Panditji was born in that area.

Panki (near Kanpur) became Panki Dham:

Robertsganj became Sonebhadra (which is the name of the district):

Chanehti became Bareilly Cantt:

And someone will have to decide which of these is correct, as the staff at the station (as well as the local authorities) in Bareilly do not seem to be sure:

It was indeed named after a British railway manager named Charles Izat, though somehow it morphed into Izzat over the years. Interestingly, both names are seen on signs in the locality.

Return to Allahabad

Here you see the map of railways around Allahabad (with an inset on the left). This is from “The Great Indian Railway Atlas”, 2015 edition.

Railways around Allahabad

And some of the existing station signboards:

This one has already had its name changed:

CheokiAllahabad Cheoki

The main station and a fake picture of it from a few months ago:

Other stations in the area:

Finally, there is a notification dated Feb 23, 2020 stating that these name changes will now take effect:

Allahabad railway name changes

Allahabad Division of NC Rly now becomes Prayagraj Division.

So now you have it. Prayag Jn will apparently remain as it is.

Allahabad City station was locally referred to as Rambagh station as that is the locality. (similar to Nampalli for HYB and Kalupur for ADI).

Allahabad Fort is shown in the map. But it does not seem to have had scheduled passenger services.

Chheoki will be renamed for the second time within a few years. But it was a non-timetabled station for many years.

Meanwhile, Gurgaon station awaits renaming to Gurugram.

Good places for hanging around

Some may need an explanation:

https://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/hindi-english/%E0%A4%AB%E0%A4%BE%E0%A4%82%E0%A4%B8%E0%A5%80-%E0%A4%A6%E0%A5%87%E0%A4%A8%E0%A4%BE

Next, we proceed to one of Guwahati’s main markets:

Fancy Bazar

Those familiar with the city will point out that the market is near the jail, where hangings were carried out. The trading community must have thought that Fancy Bazar sounded better than Phansi, which would be bad for business. Hence the present name.

Then there is this small town near Siliguri. It is important enough to be marked on highway signs. Here is one sign which indicates its name:

Phansidewa TTI

It is unclear why this nondescript place was associated with hanging.

You can see the town here.

https://www.google.com/maps/place/Phansidewa+734434,+Bangladesh/@26.5891217,88.35675,15z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x39e45b3050a20c8d:0xbd2dd4a74361baa1!8m2!3d26.5885778!4d88.3712796?hl=en

The nearby station was indeed named Phansidewa. By the early 1970s it was renamed:

Nijbari

It is on one of the main routes leading to North-East India.

There are, of course, other places with morbid-sounding names. One of the better known ones is Tombstone, Arizona which was the site of many shootouts in the days of the Wild West:

Tombstone welcome sign

 

Tombstone sign 2

Examples of the town’s history (with a lot of graveyard humour) can be seen in this tourist brochure:

https://tombstonetimes.com/following-the-gunsmoke-trail/